block

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block

2. a casing housing one or more freely rotating pulleys
3. Pathol
a. interference in the normal physiological functioning of an organ or part
b. See heart block
c. See nerve block
4. Psychol a short interruption of perceptual or thought processes
5. Computing a group of words treated as a unit of data on a tape, disk, etc
6. Athletics short for starting block
7. Cricket a mark made near the popping crease by a batsman to indicate his position in relation to the wicket

Block

A large piece of stone, taken from the quarry to the mill for sawing and further working.

Block

 

in engineering:

(1) A unit of a mechanism in the form of a wheel with a groove around its circumference over which a cable or chain is drawn. It is used to change the direction of a tractive force and to obtain a force or velocity advantage; more rarely, to transfer a torque. Depending on their function, blocks are known as guide, balance, runner, and driving (for imparting rotary motion to a shaft) pulleys. In order to achieve a large force or velocity advantage, a lifting mechanism made up of a combination of blocks (a block and tackle) is used.

(2) A subassembly of a machine, consisting of several identical parts, such as a block of cylinders in an internal combustion engine or the spindle block in a multiple-spindle machine.

(3) A stone (concrete or ceramic) of large size (appreciably larger than a brick) used in the construction of buildings and for road surfacing.

N. IA. NIBERG

block

[bläk]
(computer science)
A group of information units (such as records, words, characters, or digits) that are transported or considered as a single unit by virtue of their being stored in successive storage locations; for example, a group of logical records constituting a physical record.
The section of a computer memory or storage device that stores such a group of information units. Also known as storage block.
To combine two or more information units into a single unit.
A contiguous group of text characters that is marked for moving, copying, saving, deletion, or some other word-processing operation.
(design engineering)
A metal or wood case enclosing one or more pulleys; has a hook with which it can be attached to an object.
(mining engineering)
A division of a mine, usually bounded by workings but sometimes by survey lines or other arbitrary limits.
In quarrying, a large portion of rock that is removed from the quarry as a solid mass for further processing at a mill.
(petroleum engineering)
The subdivision of a sea area for the licensing of oil and gas exploration and production rights.
(statistics)
In experimental design, a homogeneous aggregation of items under observation, such as a group of contiguous plots of land or all animals in a litter.

block

block, 6
1. A masonry unit; a concrete block.
2. (Brit.) A walling unit which exceeds in length, width, or height the dimensions specified for a brick.
3. A solid piece of wood or other material.
4. A plank or timber which serves as bridging between joists or the like.
5. In quarrying, the large piece of stone, generally squared, that is taken from the quarry to the mill for sawing, slabbing, and further working.
6. A mechanical

block

1. <unit> A unit of data or memory, often, but not exclusively, on a magnetic disk or magnetic tape.

Compare record, sector.

block

(1) A group of disk or tape records that is stored and transferred as a single unit. On a CD, a block consists of 98 frames of 33 bytes for a total of 3,234 bytes, or 1/75th of a second. See block level.

(2) A group of bits or bytes that is transmitted or processed as a single unit.

(3) A group of text characters that has been marked for moving, copying, saving or other operation.

(4) A rectangular group of pixels that are processed as a unit.

(5) A group of program statements that are treated as a unit based on the results of a comparison.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was therefore a fitting finale to Ian's career when he was invited to perform there with The Blockheads.
All the big hitters, the play's title track, Billericay Dickie, Sex & Drugs & Rock & Roll, The Blockheads and Sweet Gene Vincent are there, with John Kelly proving a booming vocalist for most of them, his particular delivery trebling the sense of anarchy in the room.
Following Graeae Theatre Company's hugely successful 2012 tour of punk musical Reasons to be Cheerful, featuring the music of Ian Dury and the Blockheads, the show is going back on the road to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the band's seminal album, New Boots and Panties
With the band now pretty much an institution in the industry, the Blockheads have fortunately lost none of their zest for performing, something most evident when playing the packed-out Globe in Cardiff, and despite near monsoon conditions outside, the venue was steaming as fans bounced along in unison.
TheBlockheads Famous for tracks such as Hit Me with Your Rhythm Stick, Sex and Drugs and Rock and Roll, What a Waste and Reasons to Be Cheerful Part Three, The Blockheads were formed in London in 1977.
His lyrics are astonishing and the Blockheads were a blinding band to have backing you.
The music biopic centres around the life of rock icon Ian Dury who was severely disabled by polio as a boy and went on to become lead singer of The Blockheads.
Washington, Mar 04 (ANI): Hollywood actor Andy Serkis will soon be hitting the studios with The Blockheads to re-record late rocker Ian Dury's beloved tunes.
Reasons To Be Cheerful - Ian Dury & the Blockheads
Its extraordinary fusion of stereometrical and biomorphic forms resulted from Genzken's radical decision in 1975 to deploy computer design to create the extremely elongated curves first of her Ellipsoids (1976-82) and later of her Hyperbolos (1979-83), mathematically exact sinuosities that seemed to suddenly stand the techno-scientistic Minimalist boxes on their male blockheads.
Asked why he thinks 100,000 Web surfers from 70 countries visit his site each week, Carter says, "There's a large number of people out there who work for blockheads.
Marx, we know, dismissed them as a sack of potatoes; lesser luminaries regarded them as stubborn and bewildered blockheads who retarded civilization's forward march and were manipulated by any wicked, reactionary despot that came along.