blonde


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

blonde

a French pillow lace, originally of unbleached cream-coloured Chinese silk, later of bleached or black-dyed silk
References in classic literature ?
Sure, now, I would be thinking the palm of me hand lied but for the coming true of the nigger man and the blonde lady and--"
With National Blonde Week kicking off on Monday, the Echo set out to discover if gentlemen really do prefer being blond.
In circular, complex reverberations, True Blonde Draped mixes a real person, the artist's imagination, art-historical references, and past images in her own oeuvre.
Like her nineteenth-century counterpart, Swanilda finds her rival's clothing and dresses up in it, donning a red suit, a blonde wig, and high heels.
coffee drinkers1 who say they prefer a lighter roast by using an innovative cross-channel campaign to win them over to Starbucks[R] Blonde Roast.
And probably because the John Frieda Sheer Blonde team wanted a reason to celebrate.
Teen actress and singer Miley Cyrus wowed fans this week by chopping off most of her hair and dying it platinum blonde.
One day a big group of blondes met in New York to show the world that blondes aren't dumb.
Caroline Jackson, breed secretary for the British Blonde Cattle Society, said: "I am delighted with the positive outcome following the time and effort that has been put into trialling Blonde beef, resulting in the inclusion of Blonde cattle on to the buyer's list for Marks and Spencer.
Broadcaster Mariella Frostrup, argues that she "would have thought twice" about going blonde at 16, when her father's death left her grey, if she'd "known then what my shade of choice suggested to the world".
It got me away from the bimbo image, and in fact within 24 hours of being blonde again I was the butt of a blonde joke at work.