blonde

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blonde

a French pillow lace, originally of unbleached cream-coloured Chinese silk, later of bleached or black-dyed silk
References in periodicals archive ?
You are normally born with fair hair that then gets darker, so blondeness is very much linked to being a child and being childlike.
A suspicion of serious misconduct can inform the kind of reading made at the start of this essay, which hints that the merry, giddy surface of Creole society masks profound problems: treating others as one's "especial property" and exchanging "murderous glances" in church, not to mention the looming but never quite acknowledged issue of Claralie's blondeness. From that perspective, the error lies in dismissing too quickly the ominous portents of the first paragraph and accepting too easily the merry tone of the second.
The song from Wicked that best exemplifies Glinda's shallowness, or her blondeness, is "Popular." Here, Glinda attempts to give Elphaba a dramatic makeover after a night of roommate bonding.
the blondes have taken their blondeness away, the brunettes
Brad was sent as a gift to womankind, you know - with his gorgeous blondeness, his hunky bod and ability to commit.
Chase is saved by her blondeness, her paleness, her collection of George Washington campaign coins, and her affirmation that she certainly is an American citizen, just "not one who was born here." Somewhat accidentally caught in the middle of the theft, she winds up allying herself with the good guys.
When the state puts its nanny hand over my glass and says no more than 14 units of alcohol a week, I have a strong desire to bite the hand - Writer Fay WeldonAs Shakespeare should have written: some girls are born blonde, some achieve blondeness and some have blondeness thrust upon them - TV personality Vanessa Feltz.
Only American Beauty's Mena Suvari adds a dash of sugary blondeness to his gloom.
Wearing a dark fur that emphasizes her blondeness and her beauty, Russell in Marilyn drag says to the judge that he should just tell her the words to say and she'll just repeat them.
Later our attention is drawn to the "striking" contrast between Dorothea's compelling presence and the "infantine blondeness" (298) of Rosamond Vincy, that fashionably artificial "stage Ariadne" (207).