bicarbonate

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bicarbonate

or

hydrogen carbonate,

chemical compound containing the bicarbonate radical, -HCO3. The most familiar of such compounds is sodium bicarbonatesodium bicarbonate
or sodium hydrogen carbonate,
chemical compound, NaHCO3, a white crystalline or granular powder, commonly known as bicarbonate of soda or baking soda. It is soluble in water and very slightly soluble in alcohol.
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 (baking soda). See carbonatecarbonate
, chemical compound containing the carbonate radical or ion, CO3−2. Most familiar carbonates are salts that are formed by reacting an inorganic base (e.g., a metal hydroxide) with carbonic acid.
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bicarbonate

[bī′kär·bə‚nət]
(inorganic chemistry)
A salt obtained by the neutralization of one hydrogen in carbonic acid.

bicarbonate

1. a salt of carbonic acid containing the ion HCO3--; an acid carbonate
2. consisting of, containing, or concerned with the ion HCO3--
References in periodicals archive ?
Sixty-three percent of the 111 TRC101 subjects treated for 52 weeks exhibited an increase in blood bicarbonate level of at least 4 milliequivalents per liter (mEq/L) or achieved a blood bicarbonate level in the normal range of 22 to 29 mEq/L, compared with 38% of the 74 placebo subjects who completed 52 weeks of treatment (p=0.0015).
Similarly in Case 2 the blood bicarbonate level was 18.3mmol/l on the initial day of presentation.
In conclusion, we can define acute ruminal acidosis as a metabolic status defined by a decrease in blood pH, parallel to blood bicarbonate decrease, which is caused by a D-lactic ruminal overproduction.
Admission temperature, serum glucose level, blood bicarbonate, and oxygen requirement were recorded.
Of interest is the fact that similar sodium bicarbonate ingestion in adult athletes as applied in our study, raises blood pH up to 7.48, increases resting blood bicarbonate levels to 32-36 mM and maintains anaerobic glycolysis at a rate which results in plasma post exercise lactate concentrations of 22-28 mM (Gaul et al., 1995; Parry-Billings and MacLaren, 1986; Thomas et al., 2005).