blood sport


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blood sport

any sport involving the killing of an animal, esp hunting
References in periodicals archive ?
HEAVYWEIGHT FIGHT Celebrating a victory at Blood Sport 2.
Barbaric blood sports are understandably unpopular in not just towns and cities, but in rural areas too.
There is one huge difference, however, between the gladiatorial combat of Roman times and the blood sport being practiced daily in the Philippines.
Parliament enacted laws abolishing lower-class blood sports, such as cock-fighting and bull-baiting, a century and a half before hunting foxes with hounds was finally prohibited by act of Parliament in 2004.
It is distressing that the disagreement over the role of gays and lesbians in the church has been turned into a blood sport between provinces.
Attacking and demonizing the federal courts has always been the blood sport of demagogues and those with small minds.
He posits a "genetic yearning for the spiritual through blood sport that lies deep within the hind brain of us all." But you don't need to agree with that to appreciate his literary effort to redefine environmentalism in a more inclusive manner.
Stewart, author of Blood Sport: The President and Ms Adversaries, a best-selling book about the Whitewater affair, disagrees, saying questioning the gay advisers was not necessarily sinister: "The cases sound peculiar, but it is not necessarily unusual at this point in the investigation to be trying to find disgruntled sources who might reveal information crucial to the investigation."
The Joffrey was being subjected, I suspect, to a bit of Yank bashing, which bad-mannered Brits still consider a jolly blood sport. But, as Clive Barnes suggests in his column on page 118, the British critics may have been reacting to our hubris at having told them for years that the center of world dance was not London but New York City.
The litmus test on what these exemplars of honest government consider Conduct Unbecoming arrived with Pulitzer prize winner James Stewart's Blood Sport. A chorus of Hill & Billy wannabes (including virtually every op-ed regular at The New York Times and Washington Post) instantly proclaimed the Clintons out of the woods on Whitewater: As despicable as their behavior may have been, no crimes were committed.
Blood Sport: The President and His Adversaries, by James B.
Stewart writes reassuringly in the foreword to "Blood Sport," it is only because you have been bam-boozled by those involved in the scandal--Bill and Hillary Clinton and the ranks of their apologists and strategists--into thinking that it is arcane and confusing.