blood vessel

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blood vessel

an artery, capillary, or vein

blood vessel

[′bləd ‚ves·əl]
(anatomy)
A tubular channel for blood transport.
References in periodicals archive ?
27 ( ANI ): A new approach has been found for protecting people with diabetes from their higher risk of advanced blood vessel disease, which sets the stage for early heart attacks and strokes, a new research has suggested.
Common signs of small blood vessel disease are impaired planning and judgment, uncontrolled laughing and crying, diminished attention span, social dysfunction, and language and vocabulary difficulties.
Cohen believes research showing that heart and blood vessel disease claimed 195 South African lives per day between 1997 and 2004 actually underestimates the true situation.
Because heart disease and stroke are both results of blood vessel disease, women and men experience these conditions differently.
Courtney McHugh was in danger of dying last year after a massive haemorrhage caused by the vascular malformation blood vessel disease she has suffered since she was a baby.
Many people with Type II do not discover they have diabetes until they are treated for a complication such as heart disease, blood vessel disease (atherosclerosis), stroke, blindness, skin ulcers, kidney problems, nerve trouble, or impotence.
After an introduction to how the heart works, risk factors, and warning signs, sections cover specific types of diseases and conditions, blood vessel disease, specific populations, diagnosis and management, and prevention and rehabilitation.
Older people with blood vessel disease, diabetes, or weakened immune systems are most at risk of developing gangrene.
A recent study (1) suggests that middle-aged people can reduce their risk of heart and blood vessel disease by eating more whole grains.
Anti-aging medicine is preventing and reversing mainly degenerative diseases, including heart and blood vessel disease, which results in heart attack and stroke; bone and joint disease; neuro-degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and dementia; and more.
There is a risk of gallstones, blood vessel disease plus kidney, liver and heart failure.
The systematic reviews of the available literature found evidence that long chain omega 3 fatty acids reduce heart attack and other problems related to heart and blood vessel disease in people who already have these conditions, as well as their overall risk of death.