blooming


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blooming

[′blüm·iŋ]
(electronics)
Defocusing of television picture areas where excessive brightness results in enlargement of spot size and halation of the fluorescent screen.
An increase in radarscope spot size due to an increase in signal intensity.
(materials)
The migration of sulfur or other substances to the surface of a sample of rubber, causing discoloration.

bloom

1. The formation of a thin film of material on the surface of paint causing it to appear lower in gloss and milky in color. It varies in composition depending on the nature of the paint, drying conditions, etc., and may sometimes be removed with a damp cloth.
2. A type of efflorescence that appears on brickwork.
3. A discoloration or change in appearance of the surface of a rubber product (as sulfur bloom and wax bloom) caused by the migration of a liquid or solid to the surface.
4. A defect on a freshly varnished surface, appearing as a cloudy film.
5. A surface film on glass; usually results from the deposition of smoke or vapor.

blooming

A condition with older CCD devices that causes distortion at the pixel level. It occurs when the electrical charge created exceeds the storage capacity of the device and spills over into adjacent pixels. Newer CCDs incorporate anti-blooming circuitry to drain the excess charge. See CCD sensor.
References in periodicals archive ?
But in 1850, the actual blooming dates began to diverge from the documented ones - the trees began flowering earlier than expected.
DisplaySetting up an attractive display is easy with blooming teas, because their natural beauty will draw customers without any effort.
A pub is the latest businesses to take advantage of a scheme to encourage bosses to be blooming.
Community efforts to keep a town blooming following a mystery poison attack have helped reap more floral success for Saltburn.
Blooming among the heath plants is Calluna vulgaris 'County Wicklow', a Scotch heather with double pink blossoms that open from white buds.
Bloom's awareness of the absurdity of existence gives his book a tone of humanist comedy akin to Falstaff, whom he calls "the mortal god of my imaginings." This Blooming of humor - it comes across as a survival tactic, since the author seems to always teeter on the brink of an emotional abyss, what he calls "the oddities of my own consciousness" - is a rather recent development: Earlier books have been mostly sober-sided, although Omens of the Millennium recounted a near-death attack of bleeding ulcers with comic gusto.

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