blossom-end rot


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blossom-end rot

[′bläs·əm ‚end ¦rät]
(plant pathology)
Any rot disease of fruit that originates at the blossom end.
A physiological disease of tomato believed to be caused by extreme fluctuations in available moisture; characterized by shallow leathery depressions with a water-soaked appearance around the tip end of the fruit.
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Tissue at the base of the fruit is damaged by the calcium shortage, setting the stage for blossom-end rot.
Do this and you should have no blossom-end rot at all.
They also fret about the weather, tomato hornworms, and blossom-end rot.
If you do, the base of the fruit is likely to split or the tomatoes may develop blossom-end rot - a dry, hard-brownish coat at the base of the fruit which will ruin them.
A: Blossom-end rot refers to deterioration of tomato fruit that starts at the bottom, blossom end of the fruit as opposed to the top or stem end.
The black leathery patches are known as blossom-end rot and are caused by irregular watering.
Periods of wet and dry weather may cause fruit to crack and may cause blossom-end rot, a condition in which the bottom of the fruit turns black and becomes mushy.
If you water spasmodically, drenching the plant one day and then leaving it to dry out, the fruits are likely to split at the bottom or you'll get blossom-end rot, where the bottom of the fruit goes brown, hard and inedible.
It's probably blossom-end rot, often caused by a low calcium level in the fruit and inconsistent soil moisture.
Not only do we see blossom-end rot on tomatoes but other fruits can be affected.
Chances are that your tomatoes are suffering from blossom-end rot, due to calcium deficiency within the fruits, caused by poor watering regimes.