blossom-end rot


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blossom-end rot

[′bläs·əm ‚end ¦rät]
(plant pathology)
Any rot disease of fruit that originates at the blossom end.
A physiological disease of tomato believed to be caused by extreme fluctuations in available moisture; characterized by shallow leathery depressions with a water-soaked appearance around the tip end of the fruit.
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As in the present study, Cantuario, Luz, Pereira, Salomao, and Reboucas (2014) observed increases in the incidence of fruits with blossom-end rot as the soil water tension increased for bell peppers.
Do this and you should have no blossom-end rot at all.
Prevent cracked fruits and blossom-end rot by mulching tomatoes heavily in early summer, after the soil has warmed.
They also fret about the weather, tomato hornworms, and blossom-end rot.
If you do, the base of the fruit is likely to split or the tomatoes may develop blossom-end rot - a dry, hard brownish coat at the base of the fruit which will ruin them.
If you do, the base of the fruit is likely to split or the tomatoes may develop blossom-end rot - a dry, hard-brownish coat at the base of the fruit which will ruin them.
A: Blossom-end rot refers to deterioration of tomato fruit that starts at the bottom, blossom end of the fruit as opposed to the top or stem end.
The black leathery patches are known as blossom-end rot and are caused by irregular watering.
For blossom-end rot, fluctuating moisture levels can interfere with the uptake of calcium.
A: Blossom-end rot is caused by lack of calcium in the fruits.