blossom-end rot


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blossom-end rot

[′bläs·əm ‚end ¦rät]
(plant pathology)
Any rot disease of fruit that originates at the blossom end.
A physiological disease of tomato believed to be caused by extreme fluctuations in available moisture; characterized by shallow leathery depressions with a water-soaked appearance around the tip end of the fruit.
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The mass of fruits with blossom-end rot (Figure 3b) varied from 1.34 to 0.83 kg per plant with the increment in irrigation depth, showing that even when plants were not subjected to water deficit (100% of automatic device for irrigation; 213 mm and 11.6 kPa), the incidence of fruits with blossomend rot was high.
Do this and you should have no blossom-end rot at all.
Hard black or brown patches on the blossom ends of ripening tomatoes indicate a physiological disorder called blossom-end rot, which is most common in large-fruited varieties.
(Calcium prevents blossom-end rot, a common tomato disease.) Linda makes her own compost, which is chock full of calcium-rich egg shells, banana peels, and coffee grounds, and before planting, she works this compost into the soil with an organic fertilizer.
If you do, the base of the fruit is likely to split or the tomatoes may develop blossom-end rot which will ruin them.
If you do, the base of the fruit is likely to split or the tomatoes may develop blossom-end rot - a dry, hard brownish coat at the base of the fruit which will ruin them.
If you do, the base of the fruit is likely to split or the tomatoes may develop blossom-end rot - a dry, hard-brownish coat at the base of the fruit which will ruin them.
The black leathery patches are known as blossom-end rot and are caused by irregular watering.
A strong plant with an extra-strong root system, it isn't plagued by the blossom-end rot that often affects other paste varieties.
For blossom-end rot, fluctuating moisture levels can interfere with the uptake of calcium.