Blow-in

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Blow-in

Method of introducing loose fiberglass, cellulose, or mineral wool to framing cavities or attic space, typically using a machine with an attached hose.
References in periodicals archive ?
MAILERS ARE HAVING SUCCESS WITH PACKAGE INSERTS, CO-OPS, BLOW-INS AND STATEMENT STUFFERS-THEY'D JUST RATHER NOT TALK ABOUT IT
Ballydehob, with its multi-coloured houses, was once known as the hippie capital of the west because of the number of 'blow-ins' (Europeans who quit the rat race and moved to Cork to enjoy the laid-back life).
No one lingers here, apart from what they call "the blow-ins", the journalists and the TV crews who are, once more, journeying to Omagh with their cameras and their tape recorders to ask these people how they feel, how they have coped, 12 months on.
The anticipated upswing in Monmouth County's gypsy-moth population is due to "blow-ins from surrounding communities that do not have a supplementary program," Shaw asserts.
There are plenty of blow-ins who have tickets but they're never there in cold and rain DAVE MCCABE on missing out on a seat at the big game
But many return in later life it seems and, in the meantime, harmony exists between those who have lived on an island all their life and the "blow-ins" now intent on breathing new life into it with ambitious business projects.
One drug squad officer said: "It is true to say Limavady has its fair share of drug dealers, most of them are 'blow-ins' from other places.
This message is conveyed through a host of media--including newsstand copy blow-ins and space ads--employed to acquire new subscribers.
Ballydehob, with its multi-coloured houses, was once known as the hippy capital of the west because of the number of 'blow-ins' - Europeans who quit the rat race and moved to Cork to enjoy the laid-back life.
Being "Blow-ins", the common name for those outsiders that have made their home hereabouts, we have no right to begrudge the local businessman their shot at financial gain.
"There's a good few Meath blow-ins that get a good education off the Kildare lads!" The atmosphere in a half empty Croke Park will be rather different to what Foley experienced in Pairc Tailteann three years ago and the pitch plays differently to what he's used to in provincial grounds.
Having talked to locals rich and poor, and to the "blow-ins" - those in-comers drawn by the prospect of a rural idyll - Mary devised a list of characters for her cast of five and the plot (based on a Best Village contest) of what she describes as a serious comedy set in the fictional Northumberland village of Aldale.