blowby


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blowby

[′blō‚bī]
(mechanical engineering)
Leaking of fluid between a cylinder and its piston during operation.

blowby

The loss of pressure in the cylinder of a reciprocating engine resulting from the leakage of burned gases past the piston rings.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Higher-mileage cars tend to have increased blowby, and blowby is one of the factors found in the literature review affecting GDI IVD.
Through normal combustion, this marker should find its way into the oil via blowby gas, and onto the intake valves via exhaustgas recirculation.
For highly boosted TGDI engines, the blowby recirculation reaches its maximum in the LSPI zone on the engine speed-load map [11].
This suggests that LSPI be triggered in a complicated condition with contributions from many variable parameters, related to the intake flow, the exhaust flow, physical conditions of the liquid oil particles entering the engine cylinder, the number density of the liquid oil particles in the blowby recirculation, the scavenging duration and flow rate, the level of hydrocarbon fouling in the intake system, etc.
The system captures, separates and coalesces air particulates in the blowby emissions and returns the oil to the crankcase with filtered gases vented to the atmosphere.
As MLRSs grow older, the engines often have more of a blowby problem, no matter how careful you are about proper idling.
We direct the blowby away from the engine by attaching 18 inches of 3/4-in hose to the breather with a standard hose clamp.
In addition to aerosol emissions, engine blowby is also a source of undesirable odors, fumes, engine compartment oil filming and roadway/garage/parking lot drips.
Looking only at the single-cylinder lab engine (CLR) tests using aircraft oil and ZMax (AvBlend), however, still shows 17-percent reduction in blowby, a six-percent reduction in piston-skirt wear, a two-percent reduction in exhaust-valve wear, and about an 8.
This sort of thing used to be limited to Lycomings, whose cam is mounted higher in the engine core, away from oil misting from the crankcase and in line with blowby from the cylinders.
Aircraft engines are riddled with blowby and the oil has to dissolve and carry away a heavy load of combustion byproducts.