blowdown

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blowdown

[′blō‚dau̇n]
(chemical engineering)
Removal of liquids or solids from a process vessel or storage vessel or a line by the use of pressure.
(mechanical engineering)
The difference between the pressure at which the safety valve opens and the closing pressure. Also known as blowback.
(meteorology)
A wind storm that causes trees or structures to be blown down.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bradley report, however, says that interstate and intrastate operators can use five options to reduce total blowdown methane emissions by 50-90% and can recover the natural gas they expel during blowdowns, whose revenue will be greater than the costs of compliance with the proposed rule.
You will still find blowdowns here, as well as numerous log jams.
Pipeline blowdowns was one of the emission sources the petition cited.
Bucks also seem to go to great lengths just to pass by a prominent blowdown, and because of this, blowdowns are great places to find deer beds, rubs, droppings and other sign.
Not so for some hiking trails that were blocked by landslides and blowdowns resulting from the Hurricane Floyd weather front that hit the Adirondacks in September 1999.
Results of this study suggest that hurricane blowdowns increase light levels immediately, but initiate a gradual change in availability of soil resources on many microsites.
The failure in the proposed rule to provide a reasonable delay of the repair provision will lead to adverse consequences, including the possible impairment of transportation service to pipeline customers during high-demand periods and increased methane emissions due to otherwise unnecessary blowdowns conducted to enable leak repairs.
INGAA Cautious About Reporting Of Methane Emissions From Blowdowns
Several years ago our community of eight homes on Washington's Orcas Island, northwest of Seattle, had a major wildfire problem: homes on a steep mountainside, south-facing (meaning dry) slopes, a heavy fuel load from major winter blowdowns, brush-clogged roads, just one route in and out, and only several fire standpipes.
A best-guess time schedule, if individual blowdowns are staggered.
Other sources which would require monitoring, though not by direct methods, include: reciprocating and centrifugal compressors, including compressor and station blowdowns, centrifugal compressor wet and dry seals, wet seal oil degassing vents, reciprocating compressor rod packing vents, unit isolation valves, blowdown valves, compressor scrubber dump valves and gas pneumatic continuous bleed devices.
The slopes are covered with potential wildfire fuel from two major blowdowns in recent years.