blowhole


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blowhole

1. the nostril, paired or single, of whales, situated far back on the skull
2. a hole in ice through which whales, seals, etc., breathe
3. a bubble-like defect in an ingot resulting from gas being trapped during solidification
4. Geology a hole in a cliff top leading to a sea cave through which air is forced by the action of the sea

blowhole

[′blō‚hōl]
(geology)
A longitudinal tunnel opening in a sea cliff, on the upland side away from shore; columns of sea spray are thrown up through the opening, usually during storms.
(metallurgy)
A pocket of air or gas formed in a metal during solidification.
(vertebrate zoology)
The nostril on top of the head of cetacean mammals.

gas pocket, blowhole

A hole or void, as in a casting, which results from entrained air.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was only after confirmation of a viable colon and identification of the optimal stoma site that we felt secure to procede with creating a blowhole colostomy instead of colectomy.
Blowholes are dependent on weather: air temperature and pressure interact to create the stunning effects when air travels from higher to lower density.
Unlike other baleen whales, the two blowholes on right whales are widely separated, causing their spouts to be seen as two distinct sprays.
Encourage students to make the whale's eyes, mouth, tail, fins, flippers and blowhole.
While we don't have blowholes, we do share a number of traits with humpback whales: we are warm blooded, breathe air, give birth to and nurse' live young.
This air is then forced through a "blowhole" and into the "Wells Turbine," named for designer Alan Wells, a professor at Queen's University.
She let us rub her belly and look into the blowhole on top of her head (dolphin use this special "nostril" to breathe).
The whale spouted water from its blowhole and moved its caudal fin when officials and volunteers resumed their attempts to save it shortly before 7 a.m.
* Blowhole: the whale's "nostril" on top of its head
That tall, white cloudis a humpback whale's breath blasting out of the animal's blowhole. As the warm air of the breath meets the cooler air sur- rounding it, water vapor turns to beads of water and creates the cloud you see.
She scooped up some water with her bucket and plashed it over him, being careful not to get any in his blowhole. Soon his body was smooth and shiny.
The most important external measurements (in cm--following Norris, 1961) are: snout to center of eye 26.9, to apex of melon 3.6, to center of blowhole 27.9, to flipper 35.6, to tip of dorsal fin 84.5, to center of umbilicus 77.5, to genital slit 99.0, and to anus 114.3; flipper anterior length 20.3, posterior length 13.3, and maximum width 5.0; dorsal fin height 11.4, and base 21.5; fluke width 30.4, and length 10.8; girth at axilla 81.2, at eye 66.0, maximum 85.0, at anus 46.9, and 30 cm anterior to fluke notch 35.5; projection of lower jaw < 0.6; length of gape 22.9; eye to gape 5.0, and to center of blowhole 17.7; blowhole length 1.0, and width 2.5; length of anal slit 3.7, and of genital slit 10.5.