blowing


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blowing

[′blō·iŋ]
(chemical engineering)
The introduction of compressed air near the bottom of a tank or other container in order to agitate the liquid therein.
(engineering)

blowing

1. See popping.
2. The upward movement of soil material at the base of an excavation or cofferdam as a result of groundwater pressure.

popping, blowing, pitting, pops

Shallow conical depressions, ranging in size from pinheads to diameters of ¼ in. (64 mm), just below the surface of a lime-putty finish coat; caused by the expansion of coarse particles of unhydrated lime or of foreign substances.
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers at Bayer MaterialScience evaluated alternative blowing agents in two commercial HCFC-22 blown foam systems for refrigerated trailers and entry doors.
Session 1 on markets and legislation will include the presentation, "Impact of regulatory developments on the demand for blowing agents in foam," by Paul Ashford, Caleb Management Services Ltd., U.K.
The core blowing simulation took less than one day of computer time.
In addition to these exothermic products, a separate line of endothermic blowing agents is available.
Session L on "Appliance" will cover processing, formulations and additives of foams blown with non-ozone-depleting blowing agents such as HFCs and hydrocarbons.
In closed-cell foams, the ever-changing climate for blowing agents is said to require quick and accurate measurements of heat transmission, and state-of-the-art data acquisition is essential.
Showing its internal air-cooling systems for blow molding, which circulate chilled air inside the part immediately after blowing.
As the uncured slab expands (from thermal expansion, curing or sponging caused by blowing agents), the probe rides on the sample surface and a read-out of the expansion is graphed on the TA recorder.
The conversion to blowing agents with zero ozone-depletion potential (ODP) is now accomplished in nearly all the major rigid foam sectors, most of which had relied on HCFC-141b as the leading first-generation replacement for now-banned CFCs.
In addition to these exothermal products, a separate line of endo-thermal blowing agents is available.
The Phillips Orbet process, developed in the late 1960s, involved cutting the tube, pinching one end dosed and then stretching and blowing. That method vied with processes developed by Hercules and Bekum for blowing bottles from a continuously extruded tube.
The new edition covers the basics of process technology, looks at the latest developments in chemistry, and includes advances in critical regulatory areas like blowing agents, combustibility, and solid-waste disposal.