blowpipe


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blowpipe

1. a tube for blowing air or oxygen into a flame to intensify its heat and direct it onto a small area
2. a long narrow iron pipe used to gather molten glass and blow it into shape

blowpipe

[′blō‚pīp]
(biology)
A small tube, tapering to a straight or slightly curved tip, used in anatomy and zoology to reveal or clean a cavity.
(engineering)
A long, straight tube, used in glass blowing, on which molten glass is gathered and worked.
A small, tapered, and frequently curved tube that leads a jet, usually of air, into a flame to concentrate and direct it; used in flame tests in analytical chemistry and in brazing and soldering of fine work.
References in periodicals archive ?
Further, he states that the blowpipe is not an original Negrito weapon, although known to and used by almost all of the Peninsular groups.
British troops fired dozens of shoulder-launched Blowpipe missiles without a hit.
Taking a jar from the bag, he dipped a point of the dart into the substance in the jar, and very carefully placed it into the end of the blowpipe.
WILD: Bruce Parry uses a blowpipe in deepest Brazil
This time he tries out a monkey-hunting blowpipe, puts his hand into a bees' nest and tries to keep a stiff upper lip as the Anutans tribe of Polynesia sob and wail at his departure.
There you can read of how Baki traded tobacco for rice across the hills in Sambas, how he learned how to hunt with a blowpipe, and how he solved the problem of no matches by observing a man with a fire-piston.
The artist Powell stands atop a raised platform and bends over the edge with his blowpipe held vertically as he forms the bulbous body in a teardrop fashion.
Also, the blowpipe now has a cool plastic mouthpiece.
PRINCE CHARLES (left) delighted the locals by trying his hand at an ancient blowpipe musical instrument during a visit to the Slovak capital of Bratislava yesterday.
Cronstedt pioneered the use of the blowpipe in mineral analysis, obtaining more accurate analyses than people had been achieving with other methods up to that time.
For many decades, chemists had to be skillful at blowpipe analysis if they expected to be successful in research.
The charcoal heated the powder to about 950'C and - along with an arsenic compound possibly applied to the hot powder through a blowpipe - provided a chemical atmosphere that encouraged small beads of tin to crystallize In the hot, black, glassy melt.