blowpipe

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blowpipe

1. a tube for blowing air or oxygen into a flame to intensify its heat and direct it onto a small area
2. a long narrow iron pipe used to gather molten glass and blow it into shape

blowpipe

[′blō‚pīp]
(biology)
A small tube, tapering to a straight or slightly curved tip, used in anatomy and zoology to reveal or clean a cavity.
(engineering)
A long, straight tube, used in glass blowing, on which molten glass is gathered and worked.
A small, tapered, and frequently curved tube that leads a jet, usually of air, into a flame to concentrate and direct it; used in flame tests in analytical chemistry and in brazing and soldering of fine work.
References in periodicals archive ?
Suddenly, here they were in a newspaper photograph in the 1990s, traditionally unclothed and carrying their blowpipes and darts.
THREE people shot from a passing car with metal darts from a jungle blowpipe are being tested for HIV and Hepatitis.
After breathing a small bubble into molten glass affixed to a long blowpipe, he rotates the pipe to create a basic fish form.
It could reach temperatures of 2,3500[degrees] C; blowpipes and bellows could then be dispensed with.
The army, on the other hand, has just ordered Crotale NG SAM systems from Thomson-CSF, to supplement its British Blowpipes.
When the Japanese soldiers approached from the coast, the tribesmen used blowpipes and the banned practice of headhunting to stop their advances.
She also once wore a camera on her head as she clambered through the rainforest of Borneo with seminomadic hunters armed with blowpipes.
The shipment of 2,700 weapons included throwing stars, butterfly knives, knuckle dusters and blowpipes.
In Brazil, we see Matis hunters using long blowpipes to shoot monkeys out of high trees, having first used toxins from frogs to increase the potency of their weapons.
For several days, a Huaorani guide led me through the rainforest, showing how his tribe uses plants for medicine, shelter and clothes, and how they hunt monkeys by climbing up trees and firing poisoned darts from blowpipes.
While they enjoy football, they still live in the traditional way, hunting wild pigs and stalking monkeys with huge blowpipes.
The diverse indigenous Dayak tribes, as well as the formerly semi-settled hunters and gatherers of Borneo (Kalimantan) such as the Punan, Berusu, and Basap have traditionally hunted for wild animals with blowpipes and poison darts.