blubber


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blubber

1. a thick insulating layer of fatty tissue below the skin of aquatic mammals such as the whale: used by man as a source of oil
2. Austral an informal name for jellyfish

blubber

[′bləb·ər]
(invertebrate zoology)
A large sea nettle or medusa.
(vertebrate zoology)
A thick insulating layer of fat beneath the skin of whales and other marine mammals.
References in periodicals archive ?
Blubber helps some marine animals maintain a high body temperature
The researchers used blubber samples to estimate the amount of PCB contamination in killer whales around the world.
"So while Inuit diets may not promote obesity for them, someone else may pack on pounds after munching on blubber. Olive oil may not be healthy for everyone either," Saey says.
PCBs lodge in fat and build up in the blubber of marine mammals.
Earlier this week, workers began cutting and peeling back layers of blubber from the whale's skeleton.
The auks or parakeets are eaten first then the blubber. Consume the bird whole and since they still have their feathers, skeleton, and innards in tact be careful to spit same out before swallowing.
Blubber, the main energy storage tissue of marine mammals, will be used both as an indicator of nutritional stress and to examine dietary changes.
Until now, little was known about how sharks, which carry fat in their massive livers rather than external blubber, make similar voyages.
This is because shark teeth are lined with nerve endings that can sense the calorie-rich blubber of a seal as opposed to the bone and muscle filling most humans.
I suppose when you're in an ice cave eating blubber, cooking blubber and blubbering into your blubber, it's a distraction keeping a note of what the penguins are up to.
Observe: Penguins, seals, and other animals that live near either the North or South Poles often have a layer of fat called blubber.