blue laws


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blue laws,

legislation regulating public and private conduct, especially laws relating to Sabbath observance. The term was originally applied to the 17th-century laws of the theocratic New Haven colony, and appears to originate in A General History of Connecticut (London, 1781), by the Loyalist Anglican clergyman Samuel A. Peters, who had lived in Hebron, Conn. New Haven and other Puritan colonies of New England had rigid laws prohibiting Sabbath breaking, breaches in family discipline, drunkenness, and excesses in dress. Although such legislation had its origins in European SabbatarianSabbatarians,
persons who insist upon strict observance of Sunday as the Sabbath. Societies promoting Sabbatarian objectives include the Lord's Day Alliance of the United States and the Lord's Day Observance Society in England.
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 and sumptuary lawssumptuary laws
, regulations based on social, religious, or moral grounds directed against overindulgence of luxury in diet and drink and extravagance in dress and mode of living.
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, the term "blue laws" is usually applied only to American legislation. With the dissolution of the Puritan theocracies after the American Revolution, blue laws declined; many of them lay forgotten in state statute books only to be revived much later. The growth of the prohibitionprohibition,
legal prevention of the manufacture, transportation, and sale of alcoholic beverages, the extreme of the regulatory liquor laws. The modern movement for prohibition had its main growth in the United States and developed largely as a result of the agitation of
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 movement in the 19th cent. and early 20th cent. brought with it other laws regulating private conduct. Many states forbade the sale of cigarettes, and laws prohibited secular amusements as well as all unnecessary work on Sunday; provision was made for strict local censorship of books, plays, films and other means of instruction and entertainment. Although much of this legislation has been softened if not repealed, there are still many areas and communities in the United States, especially those where religious fundamentalism is strong, that retain blue laws. The Supreme Court has upheld Sunday closing laws ruling that such laws do not interfere with the free exercise of religion and do not constitute the establishment of a state religion.

blue laws

restrict personal action to improve community morality. [Am. Hist.: Hart, 87]
References in periodicals archive ?
Sometimes Baptists emerge from the grassroots, as in the case of literal Baptists who supported Prohibition and Blue Laws. Sometimes the Baptists are watered by bootleggers, who provide generous donations to such groups.
The state Supreme Court agreed that the Blue Laws were already filled with so many exceptions that there was no basis in preventing Kroger from opening on Sundays," explains Davis.
"[Opponents] say the increase in sales would be marginal, but when we look at what happens in other states that repealed blue laws, we see the opposite happens," Gray said.
From the opening of the 1929 season Passon used the field as a location from which to challenge the Blue Laws, scheduling his (white) Passon Athletic Club for Sunday games.
Roosevelt embodied the hypocrisy of his fellow social elite, taking full advantage of loopholes in the blue laws that allowed alcohol to flow legally in private clubs and hotel restaurants, second homes for the male gentry.
Hammond Trumbull's Blue Laws, True and False, Leigh Hunt's The Town and Timbs's Curiosities of London, among others.
Rohdieck is proud of his community's success and ability to compete with destinations like Las Vegas, especially when the blue laws are factored into the equation.
He makes passing reference to Louisville's blue laws, which prevented Sunday games, but he provides no further discussion of this important topic in baseball history.
The research by a Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) researcher, together with a researcher from De-Paul University, also reveals that when Sunday blue laws are repealed, women who choose secular activities, such as shopping, are not happier.
The alternative is to "re-regulate, collectively, the use of our time." Shulevitz isn't calling for the return of blue laws. Rather, she wants labor law with teeth.
She parses Max Weber along with the Talmud, Saint Paul along with George Eliot, blue laws along with the Babylonian exile.