blue stain


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blue stain

[′blü ‚stān]
(plant pathology)
A bluish stain of the sapwood of many trees that is caused by several fungi, especially of the genera Fusarium, Ceratostomella, and Penicillium.

blue stain

A dark stain in the sapwood of some species of trees, usually caused by a fungus; it does not weaken the wood; also called sap stain.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using MPB-killed trees to produce cut stock that is finished with a transparent, semi-transparent or even a solid color where the blue stain is concealed is another possibility for reducing the amount of standing dead timber in Colorado.
The scraps were smeared into the centre of the glass slides & immediately fixed in 90% alcohol for one hour, then stained with Perls' Prussian blue stain (which consist of Potassium ferrocyanide and HCl) which reacts with the ferritin in the cells to form blue coloured granules.
Microscopic examination of new methylene blue stained smears revealed dark blue coloured, foot print shaped or peanut shaped Malassezia pachydermatitis organisms (Fig.
Parameters studied included the number of cells /unit area in control, immobilised and re-mobilised groups; and the intensity of staining in control, immobilised and re-mobilised groups using Alcian Blue stain for evaluating cartilage matrix.
Blue stain is widely cited as a problem with anigre.
Interestingly, trypan blue stained positively in the male accessory glands of adult flies grown on food containing 10.0 [micro]L/mL effluent, indicating tissue damage in this gland.
The treatment of pinewood chips with the blue stain fungus Ceratocystis coerulescens for four weeks led to a reduction in aldehyde emissions of the produced pellets with more than 80%.
The direct smears were stained with Gram stain, Polychrome Methylene blue stain, India Ink and Ziehl-Neelsen stain.
According to the WWPA, ponderosa pine is "subject to blue stain if a felled tree or green lumber becomes too warm before it is dried." The blue stain will not affect strength and is used in some lower grades of lumber, where it can be hidden with paint or ascented with a clear finish.
This occurs predominantly on the sapwood and is caused by fungi from various groups, including blue stain fungi, black yeasts, colored molds, and/or decay fungi (Uzunovic et al.