blue stragglers

blue stragglers

Stars that are frequently found in open and globular clusters and that lie on the extension of the main sequence beyond the turnoff point: they are ‘blueward’ of the turnoff in color-magnitude diagrams (see illustration at globular cluster). Because such stars have main-sequence lifetimes much shorter than the age of the cluster, they should already have evolved away from the main sequence. Their existence has been a long-standing puzzle. In one model, they are stars that have been rejuvenated by mass transfer from a binary companion. Alternatively, they may represent the result of the merger of two stars after a stellar collision. Recent observations have provided some support for both scenarios. Some blue stragglers are now known to be members of close binaries. In addition, observations with the HST have revealed large numbers of blue stragglers in the cores of several globular clusters, where collisions between stars are significant. See also tidal capture.
References in periodicals archive ?
Indeed, the high stellar densities in their cores boost the formation of exotic populations like Blue Stragglers (BSs) which seem to be present in essentially all GCs.
Natalie Gosnell, an astronomer at the University of Wisconsin--Madison, and colleagues discovered three blue stragglers that share orbits with white dwarfs, the remnants of dead stars.
The re-invigorated stars are called blue stragglers, and their high mass and brightness are properties that lie at the heart of this study.
It contains a large variety of stars, from highly evolved red giants to white dwarfs and blue stragglers. Lying at RA 8h 52m and Dec +11[degrees] 46' it is around 1 1/2[degrees] west of mag 4.3 alpha Cancri.
"Blue stragglers" have been a mystery since Allan Sandage discovered them in 1953.
For over centuries, astronomers and scientists have explored the space to spot the blue stragglers, popularly known as the Vampire stars to study the unique mechanism of formation of these stars.
Many of these are thought to be "blue stragglers": old stars that burn as hot and bright as if they were part of a young stellar population.
In the middle of the last century, a population of stars called blue stragglers was discovered.
Yet, astronomers have found resident bright stars, known as blue stragglers, that are nearly twice as massive as the sun and one-tenth the age of the clusters.
Washington, May 26 (ANI): NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has found a rare class of oddball stars called blue stragglers in the hub of our Milky Way, the first detected within our galaxy's bulge.
The beneficiaries are blue stragglers, stars whose appearance belies their true age.
As an example of such a merger, consider the oddball stars known as blue stragglers. Hotter and more massive than the sun, these stars would normally burn out in a few billion years.