bluestone

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bluestone,

common name for the blue, crystalline heptahydrate of cupric sulfatecupric sulfate
or copper (II) sulfate,
chemical compound, CuSO4, taking the form of white rhombohedral crystals or amorphous powder. It decomposes at 650°C; to cupric oxide (CuO).
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 called chalcanthite, a minor ore of copper. It also refers to a fine-grained, light to dark colored blue-gray sandstonesandstone,
sedimentary rock formed by the cementing together of grains of sand. The usual cementing material in sandstone is calcium carbonate, iron oxides, or silica, and the hardness of sandstone varies according to the character of the cementing material; quartz sandstones
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. Deposits are extensively quarried as flagstone (paving stone) in New York and Pennsylvania and used commercially for buildings and paving stone.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

bluestone

A dense fine-grained sandstone that splits easily along bedding planes to form thin slabs. See also: Stone
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

bluestone

[′blü‚stōn]
(mineralogy)
(petrology)
A sandstone that is highly argillaceous and of even texture and bedding.
The commercial name for a feldspathic sandstone that is dark bluish gray; it is easily split into thin slabs and used as flagstone.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bluestone

A hard, fine-grained, commonly feldspathic and micaceous sandstone or siltstone of dark greenish to bluish gray color that splits readily along bedding planes to form thin slabs; commonly used to pave surfaces for pedestrian traffic. A variety of flagstone.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stonehenge was built using bluestone from the Preseli Hills in Pembrokeshire Steve Allen
It's not just the dedicated staff, or the breathtaking views, or the tranquillity that swathes Bluestone like mist.
Indeed, the unique nature of Bluestone is the reason why, less than 18 months after opening, it is well on its way to becoming the UK's best-loved short break destination.
TRAGIC: Jill met her lover at work; KILLER: Karl Bluestone battered son Chandler; OTHER MAN: Gary Edwards told colleagues he was Jill Bluestone's lover
A flying cup hit his daughter Jessica, then aged four, on the leg and Mrs Bluestone fled the house with baby Henry.
After being arrested for a breach of the peace Mr Bluestone swallowed a bottle of pills while sitting in the back of a patrol car taking him to a police station.
The Bluestones do realize that one cannot just wait for a restructured workplace to happen.
The collection of ill-assorted bluestones at Stonehenge can only be an assemblage of glacial erratics, left by the wasting ice somewhere to the west of Stonehenge."
We would also like to point out that transportation of the bluestones by humans from the Preseli Hills to Salisbury Plain is not the only explanation of how the stones were moved; there is evidence (Thorpe et al.
``Long before Stonehenge was conceived of, Pembrokeshire bluestones were revered as being endowed with mystical qualities, which is why they were taken in the first place.
According to archaeologist Geoffrey Wainwright, president of the Society of Antiquaries, the so-called healing quality attributed to Preseli bluestone can be traced as far back as the Stone Age.
Mr Bluestone locked himself in their home with the other children.