bluetongue


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

bluetongue

[′blü‚təŋ]
(veterinary medicine)
An arthropod-borne disease of ruminant species that is caused by a ribonucleic acid–containing virus in the genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae; acute infection evokes high fever, excessive salivation, nasal discharge, hyperemia (buccal and nasal mucosa, skin, coronet band), and erosions and ulcerations of mucosal surfaces in the mouth.
References in periodicals archive ?
"All livestock arriving from countries affected by bluetongue are tested for infection with the virus, and animals that test positive are culled with no compensation," added the organisations.
If imported animals are found to be infected with Bluetongue, they will be culled, with no compensation.
Britain is officially free of bluetongue, with the last outbreak occurring in the south of England in 2007.
Bluetongue (BT) an arthropod-borne disease can also occur by biting midge Culicoides spp.
The pathology and pathogenesis of bluetongue. J Comp Pathol.
The UK and Welsh Government will continue to press the EU to amend legislation to allow farmers to use vaccination when bluetongue zones are not in place.
The National Farmers' Union (NFU) said there was no evidence that bluetongue was circulating in the region and warned farmers to take extra care when importing animals.
The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) has announced that the Bluetongue protection zone will be extended from tomorow, to cover Merseyside as well as Halton, Warrington, Ellesmere Port and Neston.
There have now been 122 cases of bluetongue in the UK since the disease was first discovered near Ipswich, Suffolk last September, 56 of which have been identified this year.
The case does not affect Scotland's status as "bluetongue free" because the infected cow was imported.
Since 1999 there have been widespread outbreaks of Bluetongue in Greece, Italy, Corsica and the Balearic Islands.
The recent outbreak of the bluetongue disease (also called catarrhal fever) in the United Kingdom and Denmark is a new sign that animal diseases are gaining ground worldwide and that states will need to invest more in detecting and fighting these outbreaks, warns the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO).