bluetongue

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bluetongue

[′blü‚təŋ]
(veterinary medicine)
An arthropod-borne disease of ruminant species that is caused by a ribonucleic acid–containing virus in the genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae; acute infection evokes high fever, excessive salivation, nasal discharge, hyperemia (buccal and nasal mucosa, skin, coronet band), and erosions and ulcerations of mucosal surfaces in the mouth.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dr Mamdouh Mohamed Ibrahim, an expert at the quarantines section at animal wealth department, the Ministry of Environment, told Arrayah that imports are prohibited from countries where disease such as Ebola, hay fever and bluetongue disease have been reported.
We hope that the bluetongue disease won't strike this year--said Popovski.
bluetongue disease, classical swine fever, feline leukemia) and zoonotic diseases (or diseases capable of being transmitted from animals to humans such as influenza, transmissible spongiform encephalopathies, and brucellosis).
Seven thousand sheep, goats and cattle died of the bluetongue disease in Berovo, Stip and Strumica, as 300,000 have been infected.
According to the Turkish authorities, the introduction of the system is a precaution against the bluetongue disease in Bulgaria.
Amman, Aug 31 (Petra) aAC" The Ministry of Agriculture has banned sheep and cattle imports from Romania after the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) reported that cases of the bluetongue disease had recently been detected in the East European country.
They are now investigating natural ways of controlling the midges - which were also the cause of an outbreak of bluetongue disease in the UK in autumn 2008.
Bluetongue disease caused by BTV serotype 2 (BTV-2) was detected in 2000 (1); serotype 1 was detected in 2006 (2).
Scientists hope to use a fungus to control the tiny pests, which can transmit the deadly bluetongue disease to sheep and cattle.
He added: "The incidence of Bluetongue disease in France dropped dramatically to just 83 cases last year from over 32,000 in 2008.
In recent years the Royal has been blighted by bad weather and, in 2008, bluetongue disease, which significantly reduced the numbers of livestock shown, and consequently visitors to the showground.
VACCINATIONS All rams entered in this year's Kelso ram sales in September must have been inoculated against bluetongue disease.