boardinghouse


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boardinghouse

A house that rents furnished rooms and provides meals for boarders in exchange for the payment of a weekly or monthly charge; especially used by workers and transients in mill towns primarily from the 18th to the early 20th centuries.
References in periodicals archive ?
I was surprised at how open the gay artists in her boardinghouse were for that time, and loved Clara's nonjudgmental friendships with them as well as with the gay artistic director of Tiffany Studios.
To allay family fears, the corporations in Lowell created boardinghouses with tightly controlled environments presided over by "respectable" women who enforced strict rules--such as mandatory church attendance and a 10 o'clock bedtime--to protect the virtue of the young women and the reputation of the Lowell factories.
She ultimately married a fellow boarder and then opened a boardinghouse of her own.
We meet at the opening of the play the owners of the boardinghouse, Seth Holly and his wife Bertha.
Here we have yet another incredible character in this cast of actors, politicians, boardinghouse keepers and freed slaves.
The house on Middagh Street, which had served as a boardinghouse for years, was a bit of a wreck but otherwise ideal.
Although he spent most of his school years in New York, Bearden visited Pittsburgh often, enjoying life in his grandparents' boardinghouse, where mill workers returning from work would sit on the steps and "tell stories about down-home in the South" (1).
Another odd Lords of Dogtown cinema glitch occurred when the producers graciously donated a cast-signed Zephyr Flex skateboard to a charity auction being held on Santa Monica Pier to benefit the Boardinghouse Mentors.
I been living in this rooming house for so long, I reckon I'm just another piece of furniture," says 35-year-old Esther Mills (Viola Davis), who has had to "play merry" at nearly two dozen parties for other women in her boardinghouse who were getting married.
The atmosphere resembles that of a performing arts boardinghouse.
Narrator B: Eight years later, a new worker, Eleanor McDonnell, arrives at a local boardinghouse.
John Nay), a boardinghouse owner unable to cope with the difficult task of feeding the rapidly growing population of single male miners.