boardinghouse


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boardinghouse

A house that rents furnished rooms and provides meals for boarders in exchange for the payment of a weekly or monthly charge; especially used by workers and transients in mill towns primarily from the 18th to the early 20th centuries.
References in periodicals archive ?
She ultimately married a fellow boarder and then opened a boardinghouse of her own.
In the early 1900s, Grandma Kate Luckey opened a boardinghouse in Madison, Wis.
In a boardinghouse bedroom, apelike with desire, lips distended and arms outstretched, he makes the longed-for move.
A boardinghouse is a survivor from Diamond City, which was washed away by hydraulic mining.
Managing such an establishment was a full-time job, and often these boardinghouse managers hired African American cooks to assist them.
Wilkes' Boardinghouse Cookbook (Ten Speed Press) by Sema Wilkes with John T.
In Paris we lived in a sort of little boardinghouse on the Place de la Republique.
The modernist poet Jess Ornsbo is represented by an absurdist play, Odysseus from Vraa, about a contemporary Odysseus returning to his wife Penelope, who runs a boardinghouse.
The migration of its original residents to other neighbourhoods and the arrival of European immigrants transformed the east end into a mixed single-family and boardinghouse area by the early 1900s.
A welcome that would surely take the form of stale bread, a hard cot in a cheap boardinghouse, salty food bound to ruin a person's digestion.
Among them are Klee Wyck (1941), dealing with the Indians; The House of All Sorts (1944), describing her experiences as a boardinghouse owner and dog breeder in Victoria; Growing Pains (1946), an autobiography; and Pause: A Sketch Book (1953), telling of her stay in an English sanatorium.