boardinghouse


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boardinghouse

A house that rents furnished rooms and provides meals for boarders in exchange for the payment of a weekly or monthly charge; especially used by workers and transients in mill towns primarily from the 18th to the early 20th centuries.
References in periodicals archive ?
To allay family fears, the corporations in Lowell created boardinghouses with tightly controlled environments presided over by "respectable" women who enforced strict rules--such as mandatory church attendance and a 10 o'clock bedtime--to protect the virtue of the young women and the reputation of the Lowell factories.
It illuminates the lives of a number of compelling individuals, like former Lowell mill-girl Susan Parson Brown who lived with a diverse group of boarders in Boston and seemed to consider the other residents part of her "family." She ultimately married a fellow boarder and then opened a boardinghouse of her own.
Juxtaposed to the soups are dishes of traditional American fare, such as chicken wings, paired with extravagant choices such as Dora Perignon, fresh daily hand-cut pastas, and hearty "boardinghouse" dishes which are served at a table and then shared by all the diners sitting there.
Narrator B: Eight years later, a new worker, Eleanor McDonnell, arrives at a local boardinghouse. She finds Sarah Bagley, a mill worker, trying to organize a strike among the girls.
His bashfulness and Forrest Gump grin instantly win over the roomers at his boardinghouse and his high school students of Greek and Latin.
In the early 1900s, Grandma Kate Luckey opened a boardinghouse in Madison, Wis.
In a boardinghouse bedroom, apelike with desire, lips distended and arms outstretched, he makes the longed-for move.
A boardinghouse is a survivor from Diamond City, which was washed away by hydraulic mining.
Through his underworld connections, he gets a room in the boardinghouse of a widow who falls for him and eventually becomes his lover.
Wilkes' Boardinghouse Cookbook (Ten Speed Press) by Sema Wilkes with John T.
18th; 638-2337), originally designed as a boardinghouse for railroad workers.
In Paris we lived in a sort of little boardinghouse on the Place de la Republique.