boat anchor


Also found in: Dictionary, Idioms.

boat anchor

(1)
Like doorstop but more severe; implies that the offending hardware is irreversibly dead or useless. "That was a working motherboard once. One lightning strike later, instant boat anchor!"

boat anchor

(2)
A person who just takes up space.

boat anchor

(3)
Obsolete but still working hardware, especially when used of an old S100-bus hobbyist system; originally a term of annoyance, but became more and more affectionate as the hardware became more and more obsolete.
References in periodicals archive ?
BRIMFIELD - Reports that the last typewriter factory in the world would close its doors were false, but the news, erroneous as it was, may have sparked interest in the clicking, clacking collectibles that were once considered useful only as boat anchors.
We unhooked the boat anchors and retrieved the first duck of our voyage.
In some areas, local laws require a diver to go down with a boat anchor to avoid disturbing marine life.
They found a 100-pound boat anchor in the same area yesterday, but they are not sure if it belongs to the ship.
Before I knew it I was in possession of the world's most expensive boat anchor, and to make things worse, I bought a flash drive with twice the memory yesterday - and it all just came flooding back.
Unfortunately for some of the larger portfolio owners though, the boat anchor just got a lot heavier.
Available choices range from vintage LPs, homemade dog biscuits, a boat anchor, and even a traveling communion set.
Because the new super-computer they'd just bought, became the PC eguivalent of a boat anchor.
A boat anchor, a stool to change a light bulb, a door stop," and "fruitcake makes the best gift since delivery services can't damage it.
To help stimulate people's creative juices, we will have a sample of a recycled fax machine at our booth, in the form of a Fax Boat Anchor,'' said Tim Dales, president of SoftTek.
Other items found by volunteers included a dirt bike, an overstuffed office chair, a toilet seat, a lawn chair, an automobile gasoline tank, a kitchen sink, a teddy bear, a grenade shell, a rifle, a shopping cart, a boat anchor, a 1958 liquor company statement, a $10 bill, an antique bottle, a lawn mower and hundreds of plastic bottles.
In a talk at Northern Clay Center in Minneapolis, she insisted that her large ceramic buckets are intended to be functional and might serve as umbrella stands--or boat anchors.