boat hook


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boat hook

[′bōt ‚hu̇k]
(naval architecture)
A long rod with a knob on one end and a metal point and hook at the other; used to push or pull other boats, logs, or objects from or to the side of a boat or to engage lines, rings, or buoys.
References in periodicals archive ?
"As he held on to the boat hook, the car sunk from underneath him and we got him on board the boat and brought him in to the pontoon to safety."
He managed to grab the craft with a boat hook and hold on long enough until he woke up those on board.
"I tried to keep his head out of the water with a boat hook but it was too late."
The Albert Dock museum has acquired a sofa cushion from the first class music room on the liner, which was retrieved from the sea off the Irish coast with a boat hook.
We would pick them up out of the water with a boat hook. There are some bad memories.'
Some of us were hit by the boat hook. But all we really worried about was the dolphins."
The lock-keeper without hesitation shot the weir in a leaky old fishing punt and recovered the two men with the aid of a boat hook.
We had been afloat for less than 24 hours and I'd already lost overboard a boat hook, a mooring spike, a camera and my wife...
Each of us has a go at coming around, designating someone to point, throwing out the toys (lifebuoy), going downwind three boat lengths and fishing him out with a boat hook. Simple.
He hands me a boat hook and points me towards a small buoy in the distance.
"The lock keeper managed to hold him up with a boat hook, but it was too late to save him."
This week, Size Matters has only gone and landed the 'holy grail' of the skate family as Peter Hammersley on a trip aboard this illustrious boat hooked into the rarest of all skates, the white skate.