bog plant


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bog plant

A plant which lives continuously in wet soil, but not in stagnant water.
References in periodicals archive ?
For instance, Small (1972) found that nutrient resorption and nutrient-use efficiency, defined as the amount of C assimilated per unit nutrient, was higher in evergreens than in deciduous plants, and in bog plants compared with non-bog plants.
Photosynthetic rates in relation to nitrogen recycling as an adaptation to nutrient deficiency in peat bog plants.
If you are creating a bog garden, bear in mind that bog plants look best in bold groups.
They look great planted between foliage bog plants such as hostas or rodgersias.
Some are almost bog plants that need wet feet to survive from year to year.
Rare bog plants, such as black bog rush and great fen sedge, depend on the area's calcium-rich, acidicwaters, while the fens are home to threatened species such as the southern damselfly, geyer's whorl snail and marsh fritillary butterflies.
Bog plants grow naturally in saturated soils and provide a nice transition between the lawn and garden and the water feature.
Bog plants like acidic soil, so line the hole with peat (sphagnum) moss and refill with a mixture of the excavated soil and other organic materials you have on hand (compost, pine needles.
All plants tested at Triangle Lake Bog possessed nitrogenase activity (NA), whereas 85 and 80% of the tested Herrick Fen and Fern Lake Bog plants, respectively, were active.
The work discussed below was initiated due to subtle, yet seemingly consistent, differences observed between similar-appearing bog plants and grassland plants, all of which were then referred to U.
Both of these occurrences stressed sphagnum, the bog's essential species, and other bog plants as they improved opportunities for invading species to take hold.