bombsight

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bombsight

[′bäm ‚sīt]
(ordnance)
A device which determines, or enables a bombardier to determine, the point in space at which a bomb must be released from an aircraft in order to hit a target.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scott, a former soldier turned inventor, wrote an article entitled "Dropping Bombs from Flying Machines: The Aeroplane as an Offensive Weapon of War." At the time, Scott, whose military service had been with the coastal artillery, was testing an aerial bombsight at the Army's new flight school at College Park, Maryland, and thus had a stake in persuading the public that military forces could prosecute effective bombardment from the air.
HG: So if you needed the bearings for the bombsights, they would take precedence over other bearings.
Developing an aiming device for level, horizontal bombing resulted in the Norden bombsight, virtually useless for skip bombing.
WWII enthusiasts who visit will be interested in the Sperry and Norden bombsights and the R-2800 Double Wasp engine, the type of power plant the P-47 Thunderbolt fighter used.
The most immediate beneficiary, Carl Norden, used Miricks system to synchronize the release of bombs, testing and calibrating experimental bombsights in the late 1920s.
Undeterred, Andrews ordered these aircraft retrofitted with low-altitude bombsights, radar, and depth charges.
With sophisticated instruments, including the Sperry and later Norden bombsights, the American bombers could theoretically hit targets, such as key factories or transportation hubs or oil refineries, with precision.
During World War II, Rolyn was totally involved in designing and building B-25 bombsights, flight level indicators, gunsights, skid indicators, radar control indicators and similar devices which was invaluable experience in producing and distributing quality products for today's optical market.
"Shortages of spare parts for such items as superchargers, bombsights, and trucks (which themselves were in short supply) were frequent." [72] However, by the beginning of 1944, more than 190,000 supply items were cataloged, spares were at satisfactory levels, and "no aircraft was long on the ground for lack of spare parts." [73] The improvement is attributable to the synergistic effects of:
At the outset of World War II, civilians were off the list of RAF bombers' principal targets, though nighttime bombing and inadequate bombsights would muddy the distinction at times.
As antiaircraft weapons improved, superchargers carried bombers above the effective range of flak; improved bombsights (Norden and Sperry) and formation pattern bombing compensated partially for the increased altitude.
They were used extensively during the 1943-1945 Allied campaign for Italy; new bombsights and undercarriage racks for dropping illumination flares made them effective nighttime harassers of Axis ground units.