bonding strength


Also found in: Medical.

bonding strength

[′bän·diŋ ‚streŋkth]
(mechanics)
Structural effectiveness of adhesives, welds, solders, glues, or of the chemical bond formed between the metallic and ceramic components of a cermet, when subjected to stress loading, for example, shear, tension, or compression.
References in periodicals archive ?
Remarkably, very light sandblasting does not appear to have affected the bonding strength and appears to increase wetting of the porcelain.
The bonding strength of VESTAKEEP PEEK (polyetheretherketone) L4000G from Evonik Industries has been tested to withstand strict operating environmental conditions.
Bonding strength between a hard chairside reline resin and a denture base material as influenced by surface treatment.
Thus, based on studies with SPI and logical analysis of protein structures, we expected the use of these modifiers to increase the exposure of functional groups to improve the bonding strength of soy flour adhesives with wood veneer both with and without added PAE polymer.
Although mechanical interlocking clearly promotes the bonding strength between two materials, when considering that good adhesion occurs with a smooth adherend as well, there should be another type of mechanism which strongly affects the bonding.
Presented as offering high performance bonding strength to both similar and dissimilar substrates, Master Bond's Polymer Supreme 46HT-2 two-component adhesive features high-temperature resistance along with desirable toughness and strength, durability, thermal cycling and shock capabilities, and electrical insulation properties.
The initial bonding strength of the adhesive may be such that the seal can move on the host surface during assembly, which can result in quality or sealing issues.
According to CardXX, the PUR adds flexibility and durability, provides high bonding strength (20 to 30 lb/in.
Some decrease in the strength of fibers was measured, but the overwhelming contribution to the loss of strength from calendering was found to be caused by a decrease in bonding strength.
This produces clay particles that are hydrated well between the interlayers, causing bonding strength to develop, while the surface of the clay itself is not over-saturated with free water.