Osteocyte

(redirected from bone cell)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.
Related to bone cell: bone marrow cell, cartilage cell

osteocyte

[′äs·tē·ə‚sīt]
(histology)
A bone cell.

Osteocyte

 

the bone cell in vertebrate animals and man. Osteocytes are formed from osteoblasts in the development of bony tissue. They consist of cell bodies, which are embedded in the cavities of the intercellular substance of bone, while their long outgrowths are located in channels that extend from the cavities.

References in periodicals archive ?
To test how the cells grow on the scaffold itself, the team incubated cultured bone cells on its surface for different lengths of time.
The key step that we are finding out is that it is this initial interaction with proteins that the bone cells are responding to," says Webster.
Leading organisations in Bone Cell research include:
Chemical cues have been known to work in cases where researchers have identified the proper additives: a hormone in the case of bone cells.
They then used human stem cells derived from bone marrow that would normally become bone cells to test the effects of the nanoparticles on stem cell proliferation and differentiation.
Using bone samples from people undergoing hip replacement surgery, researchers from the University of Southampton were able to show that the drug - a protein that activates a molecular pathway called the 'Wnt' pathway - causes stem cells found within bones to divide and to turn into more bone cells.
Among specific topics are bone modeling and remodeling, skeletal hard tissue biomechanics, skeletal growth and development, hormonal effects on bone cells, and pharmaceutical treatments of osteoporosis.
The study is novel in that the researchers directly delivered bone-producing instructions (using piece of DNA that encodes for a platelet-derived growth factor called PDGF-B) to existing bone cells in vivo, allowing those cells to produce the proteins that led to more bone production.
Broken bones and joint replacements someday may heal faster, thanks to an unusual coating for medical implants under development, reports the journal Ceramics International, as researchers have found that bone cells grow and reproduce faster on a textured surface than they do on a smooth one--and they grow best when they can cling to a microscopic shag carpet made of tiny metal oxide wires.
The findings confirmed previous work showing that tributyltin affects the regulation of body fat production and reprograms certain stem cells to become fat cells rather than bone cells.
Libera has been awarded a patent titled “Surfaces Differentially Adhesive to Bacteria & Eukaryotic Cells” for a technology that repels bacteria and promotes the growth of bone cells around an implant.
The ability to control whether certain stem cells ultimately become bone cells holds great promise for regenerative medicine and potential therapies aimed at treating metabolic bone diseases.