Suppression

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suppression

[sə′presh·ən]
(computer science)
Removal or deletion usually of insignificant digits in a number, especially zero suppression.
Optional function in either on-line or off-line printing devices that permits them to ignore certain characters or groups of characters which may be transmitted through them.
(electronics)
Elimination of any component of an emission, as a particular frequency or group of frequencies in an audio-frequency of a radio-frequency signal.

Suppression

 

in genetics, a phenomenon that prevents the appearance of a character resulting from mutation and that causes partial or complete restoration of the normal phenotype.

Intragenic suppression is caused by a second (suppressor) mutation in the same gene in which the first (direct) mutation occurred. Intergenic suppression is caused by a second mutation in other genes that are located at a considerable distance from the suppressed gene. In intragenic suppression, a protein coded by a given gene can reacquire functional activity, although its original structure, in contrast to true reverse mutation, or reversion, is not restored. In intergenic suppression, the normal phenotype may be restored in some cases owing to mutations that permit other means of metabolism which do not require the functioning of the given gene. In other cases, the normal phenotype may be restored as a result of mutations that alter the process by which the genetic information of the mutant gene is realized.

The phenomenon of suppression, first discovered in 1920 by the American geneticist A. H. Sturtevant, is used to study the genetic code and other aspects of molecular genetics.

REFERENCE

Stent, G. Molekuliarnaia genetika. Moscow, 1974. Chapter 6. (Translated from English.)

I. I. TOLSTORUKOV

References in periodicals archive ?
The expected nadir for bone marrow suppression with lomustine is 4 weeks, with resolution at 6 weeks (Polovich et al.
All of the immunosuppressant drugs can suppress the bone marrow cells at high doses, but severe bone marrow suppression is uncommon in low-dose therapy, and frequent blood monitoring can help in early detection or prevention.
However, the physiopathology of the bone marrow suppression in this disease is still unclear.
Although dosing up to 800 mg/day is acceptable, concerns about intolerance based on reports of severe hypersensitivity syndrome, rash, gastrointestinal problems, increases in liver enzymes, and rare bone marrow suppression tend to scare physicians away from prescribing higher doses, he noted.
However, allopurinol isn't always effective for achieving target serum urate levels and concerns about intolerance based on reports of severe hypersensitivity syndrome, rash, gastrointestinal problems, increases in liver enzymes, and bone marrow suppression, tend to scare physicians away from prescribing higher doses, he noted.
Over 750 patients, to date, have received romidepsin in clinical trials with the most common adverse effects including fatigue, gastrointestinal disturbances and generally mild to moderate bone marrow suppression.
With the exception of Fas and sFas-L results, other changes could better be explained by bone marrow suppression with varicella infection because of their similarity.
These include reversible bone marrow suppression and, less commonly, idiosyncratic aplastic anemia that can occur even months after exposure, Dr.
The combination of romidepsin and gemcitabine was generally well tolerated with the most common adverse events being gastrointestinal disturbances, fatigue, bone marrow suppression and anorexia.

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