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mackerel

mackerel, common name for members of the family Scombridae, open-sea fishes including the albacore, bonito, and tuna. They are characterized by deeply forked tails that narrow greatly where they join the body; small finlets behind both the dorsal and the anal fins; and sleek, streamlined bodies with smooth, almost scaleless skins having an iridescent sheen. All members of the mackerel family are superb, swift swimmers. The firm, oily texture of their powerful muscles and their generally large size make them of great commercial importance as food fish. They travel in schools, feeding on other fish (chiefly herring) and on squid, and migrate between deep and shallow waters. The smaller species rely on the constant rush of water through their gills for sufficient oxygen and will suffocate if motionless. The largest of the family, the enormous (up to 3-4 ton/680 kg) tunas, are among the few warm-blooded fishes, due to the constant operation of their huge banks of muscles. Of the smaller members of the family, the Atlantic, or common, mackerel, Scomber scombrus, found in colder waters off North America and Europe, is one of the smallest (11-2 lb/0.675 kg average). Despite its size, the annual catch is 1 million tons, which is marketed fresh, salted, and canned. Intermediate between the Atlantic mackerel and the bonitos (see tuna) are the frigate mackerels, or frigate tunas, found in warm seas. Spotted species found off the Florida and Gulf coasts include the Spanish, painted (or cero), and Serra mackerels, averaging 10 to 15 lb (4.5–6.7 kg). Other species are the king mackerel, also called kingfish (up to 60 lb/27 kg); the chub mackerel, similar to the Atlantic mackerel; and the cosmopolitan and more solitary wahoo, or peto. The snake mackerels, including the escolars and oilfish (some species of which are sometimes marketed as white tuna or codfish), belong to the family Gempylidae. Mackerels and snake mackerels are classified in the phylum Chordata, subphylum Vertebrata, class Actinopterygii, order Perciformes, families Scombridae and Gempylidae, respectively.
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bonito

1. any of various small tunny-like marine food fishes of the genus Sarda, of warm Atlantic and Pacific waters: family Scombridae (tunnies and mackerels)
2. any of various similar or related fishes, such as Katsuwonus pelamis (oceanic bonito), the flesh of which is dried and flaked and used in Japanese cookery
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
But nearly everyone will agree that our bonito is a terrific day-saver.
You can smugly announce to your crew: That's not a bonito, THIS is a bonito!
It's true: There is a real bonito in Florida waters, one whose common name, Atlantic bonito, is recognized by the International Game Fish Association, National Marine Fisheries Service, Kells & Carpenter's Field Guide, and other authorities.
The Atlantic bonito, Sarda sarda, is relatively common in northern U.S.
French angler Cecile Klein was slow trolling a live bonito off Rodrigues Island, Mauritius on March 5, 2013 when his toothy tuna nailed the bait and started peeling the line off her Shimano 50W.
I've had 400-pound blue marlin and 80-pound wahoo chase a bonito into the prop, and amberjacks the size of kayaks eat small bonito off the stern.
You'll also encounter fish like sailfish that regularly change directions so that when you try to lead a fish, a perfect cast can easily turn into a bonito bait.
In every area of the state there are wrecks known to hold baitfish, and those same wrecks will always hold their share of predators, from barracuda and amberjacks to schools of strafing bonito and opportunistic sailfish, dolphin and wahoo.
''The fishery industry should rather suggest to consumers new ideas for eating bonitos so that their consumption can be boosted,'' an agency official said.
Due to constant increases in bonito catches as well as declines in demand in other countries, the international price of bonito plunged to $350 per ton in July, compared with the average price of $900 last year, according to the agency.
Bonito catches have grown steadily as fish boats become larger, with the annual volume worldwide rising to 1.4 million tons in 1997 from 400,000 tons in 1970.
If you like the light tackle action of Spanish and bonito, take them and either drag a dead Spanish behind the boat or strip outa bonito belly and slow troll it on a jighead and hang on!