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bonus,

extra amount in money, bonds, or goods over what is normally due. The term is applied especially to payments to employees either for production in excess of the normal (wage incentive) or as a share of surplus profits. The wage incentive was designed during the late 19th cent. not only to increase production but to reward the more skillful and more energetic workers. The hourly or weekly wage was to be figured as payment for a standard rate of work, and the workers who exceeded that standard were to receive a bonus. However, the system fell into disfavor with labor unions because rate cutting was often resorted to when bonuses became too high. Industrial engineers of the 1930s realized that definite standards of accomplishment and quality must be set to make wage incentives workable. Many firms have used an annual bonus plan for distributing abnormal profits to employees. The term is also applied to payments to former servicemen in addition to regular pensions and insurance. Veterans of World War I lobbied to obtain a bonus for their military service. In 1924 each veteran received an adjusted compensation certificate entitling him to a payment averaging $1,000 to be made in 1945. In 1932 about 15,000 unemployed veterans formed the "Bonus Expeditionary Force," or Bonus MarchersBonus Marchers,
in U.S. history, more than 20,000 veterans, most of them unemployed and in desperate financial straits, who, in the spring of 1932, spontaneously made their way to Washington, D.C.
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, and marched to Washington to demand immediate payment of the certificates. President Hoover ordered troops to oust them from federal property. In 1936 Congress passed a law permitting the veterans to exchange their certificates for cashable bonds. A number of states voted veterans' bonuses after World War II and the Korean War.

Bibliography

See W. W. Waters, B.E.F.: The Whole Story of the Bonus Army (1933, repr. 1969); V. D. Kennedy, Union Policy and Incentive Wage Methods (1945, repr. 1969); J. K. Louden, Wage Incentives (2d ed. 1959); R. Marriott, Incentive Payment Systems (3d rev. ed. 1968).

bonus

[′bō·nəs]
(petroleum engineering)
Payment by a lessee of an oil- or gas-production royalty to the landowner at a rate greater than the customary one-eighth of the value of the oil or gas withdrawn.
References in periodicals archive ?
The order signed by Duterte slashes by at least 2/3 the bonuses being received by appointees in 'class A' GOCCs or those with assets of at least P100 billion and revenue of at least P10 billion a year.
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The P45,000 in bonuses does not include the 13th and 14th-month pay also received by Capitol employees in May and November this year.
Some say the bonuses are an unintended - or inevitable - consequence of trying to apply competitive market principles to government.
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"Skilled professionals are in growing demand but in short supply, and thus bonuses are being used to reward existing staff and acquire new talent.
* Discretionary: Many employers have bonuses that they pay out at the end of the year, or more frequently, depending on the financial standing of the business, among other factors.
The ONS said the rise was due largely to firms moving away from deferring bonuses to April and instead paying them in March.
Generous deposit bonuses, game-of-the-month bonuses, daily random draws bonuses and frequent six-figure progressive jackpot wins have made this casino popular around the world.
"Investment banking bonuses ranged from a low of one and a half month's bonus up to a high of seven months basic for one bank.
Oregon's assistant coaches also will receive bonuses totalling $333,665 for appearing in the Alamo Bowl, not including any bonus money paid to offensive coordinator Scott Frost, who left to become the head coach at Central Florida.
Zurich's survey also found the majority of company bonuses (81 per cent) equated to one month's salary or less; while a lucky seven per cent received a bonus worth three times or more their monthly salary.