boogie-woogie


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boogie-woogie

a style of piano jazz using a dotted bass pattern, usually with eight notes in a bar and the harmonies of the 12-bar blues
www.jazzinamerica.org
References in periodicals archive ?
Boogie-Woogie is a musical genre that became popular during the late 1920s and 1940s extending from blues.
There was a beatific smile in evidence as he built and layered insistent, pulsating boogie-woogie rhythms or souped up a spot of Wagner on the Phil's Steinway grand - the piano seemingly a natural extension of the Holland hands.
This book is a new edition of a work published in 1989 with a slightly different title: A Left Hand Like God: A History of Boogie-Woogie Piano (New York: Da Capo).
My hopes for such a history were raised by the fact that the checklist for the Paris exhibition included both Kandinsky's Impression III (Konzert) of 1911, the painting he made the day after hearing a concert of Schonberg's music in Munich, and Mondrian's New York City, 1942, started shortly after his discovery of boogie-woogie. These two titanic canvases mark out the extremes--chronological, conceptual, and cultural--of the art-music debate during the heroic era of European modernism.
The boogie-woogie pianist and his big band will be joined by singers Sam Brown and Ruby Turner at the city's Playhouse on August 2.
While Rebennack is more familiar for a Creole-flavoured blues, jazz and boogie-woogie these days, his classic late 60s album Gris-Gris saw him unleash the sound of deranged, psychedelic swamp-rock.
He clearly knew boogie-woogie, the dynamic, colorful music that reached its peak in 1938, when Albert Ammons, Pet Johnson, and Meade Lux Lewis brought it to Carnegie Hall (5).
Building flashy styles with roots in ragtime, boogie-woogie more than any other blues style, had a run in high-society circles before petering out as most fads do.
Despite the name, they weren't some hippy band from the '70s, but rocked solid with a kind of boogie-woogie side at times.
New to audiences might be the fact that the lindy hop, along with the Charleston, cakewalk, minstrel blues and boogie-woogie, was not originally called swing, but rather jazz.
The ensuing styles, namely Blues, Swing, and Boogie-woogie thus become the focus of this study.
Gavin Povey is a dynamite pianist and singer, heavily influenced by the sounds of New Orleans, performing an eclectic mix of R 'n B, Boogie-Woogie, Swing, Stride, Funk and Rock & Roll mixed in with a dash of Jazz, Country and Blues.