Booster

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booster

1. Radio Television
a. a radio-frequency amplifier connected between an aerial and a receiver to amplify weak incoming signals
b. a radio-frequency amplifier that amplifies incoming signals, retransmitting them at higher power
2. another name for supercharger
3. short for booster dose

Booster

 

a device for increasing fluid pressure; it consists of two interconnected cylinders (see Figure 1).

Figure 1. Hydraulic booster: (1) small-diameter plunger, (2) large-diameter piston, (3) working fluid

In the low-pressure cylinder of a booster there is a piston of large diameter D connected to a plunger of small diameter d in the high-pressure cylinder. The resultant pressure ph, will be (D2/d2) times greater than the initial pressure pi (a factor of 40–60). Boosters, mainly of the hydraulic type, have limited use in modern hydraulic presses (to increase the compression force) and in pneumatic-hydraulic amplifiers (in multiple-point clamping devices for machine tools).

booster

[′büs·tər]
(aerospace engineering)
(electricity)
A small generator inserted in series or parallel with a larger generator to maintain normal voltage output under heavy loads.
(electronics)
A separate radio-frequency amplifier connected between an antenna and a television receiver to amplify weak signals.
A radio-frequency amplifier that amplifies and rebroadcasts a received television or communication radio carrier frequency for reception by the general public.
(immunology)
The dose of an immunizing agent given to stimulate the effects of a previous dose of the same agent.
(mechanical engineering)
A compressor that is used as the first stage in a cascade refrigerating system.
(ordnance)
An assembly of metal parts and explosive charge provided to augment the explosive component of a fuse, to cause detonation of the main explosive charge of the munition.

Booster

A data-parallel language.

"The Booster Language", E. Paalvast, TR PL 89-ITI-B-18, Inst voor Toegepaste Informatica TNO, Delft, 1989.
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Clarins Booster Energy (orange bottle) is formulated for cell renewal.
Clarins BOOSTER Detox is specifically designed for congested skin.
At the moment children weighing as little as 15kg (2st 4lbs) - that's around three years old - can travel in backless booster seats.
Wilson signal boosters outperform the competition by delivering:
BS 8487 (Design and construction of gas boosters used in association with combustion equipment--Specification) 'favours' automatic booster operation but this is not an imperative.
Sports teams in a growing number of school districts can only return to their fields, gymnasiums, rinks and pools each September with the support of parent-run booster clubs.
By using the best-of-the-best from shuttle and improving on previous investments, we will produce the needed solid booster for the first SLS flights," said Dan Dumbacher, NASA's deputy associate administrator for Exploration Systems Development at NASA's headquarters in Washington, D.
When used in combination with a positioner, the booster allows control valves with large pneumatic actuators to be controlled quickly and precisely, even in applications with high flow rates or significant pressure drops.
Unlike carseats, boosters don't involve complicated installation that could potentially negate their safety if incorrectly installed, so belt fit is a crucial determinant of how well it would do its job in an impact.
It requires parents to stick kids in backseat booster seats until they turn age 8 or reach a specified height.
All six monkeys had antibodies to SIV in their vaginal fluid after such booster treatment.
The investigation reported here was carried out in order to study the chemically accelerated mastication of pentachlorothiophenol derivatives and boosters, how carbon black affects depolymerization, to compare the respective vulcanizate properties in general and aging in particular, and to consider the economics of mixing in the presence of peptizing agents.