boost

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boost

the amount by which the induction pressure of a supercharged internal-combustion engine exceeds that of the ambient pressure

boost

[büst]
(aerospace engineering)
An auxiliary means of propulsion such as by a booster.
To supercharge.
To launch or push along during a portion of a flight.
(electronics)
To augment in relative intensity, as to boost the bass response in an audio system.
(engineering)
To bring about a more potent explosion of the main charge of an explosive by using an additional charge to set it off.

boost

i. Any temporary augmentation of thrust or power given to a flying vehicle during takeoff, climb or other part of its flight, as with booster rocket or by means of RATO rocket-assisted takeoff (RATO).
ii. Excess pressure, over and above a datum (usually one bar), in the induction manifold of a piston engine. This may be positive or negative.
iii. To supercharge or turbocharge an engine.
References in classic literature ?
Here are the names of seven respectable brokers," Wingrave continued, passing a sheet of paper towards him.
The news of the dealing, however, had got about, and although derision was the chief sentiment amongst the brokers, the price steadily mounted.
The brokers, however, now understood, or thought they understood, the situation.
One broker left him a check for twenty thousand dollars, another for nearly forty thousand.
The machine sitting at that desk was no longer a man; it was a busy New York broker, moved by buzzing wheels and uncoiling springs.
He who has been denied the spectacle of a busy Manhattan broker during a rush of business is handicapped for the profession of anthropology.
In the midst of this growing and important stress the broker became suddenly aware of a high-rolled fringe of golden hair under a nodding canopy of velvet and ostrich tips, an imitation sealskin sacque and a string of beads as large as hickory nuts, ending near the floor with a silver heart.
Rebecca was entirely surprised at the sight of the comfortable old house where she had met with no small kindness, ransacked by brokers and bargainers, and its quiet family treasures given up to public desecration and plunder.
When Rawdon and his wife wished to communicate with Captain Dobbin at the sale, and to know particulars of the catastrophe which had befallen Rebecca's old acquaintances, the Captain had vanished; and such information as they got was from a stray porter or broker at the auction.