borderland


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borderland

[′bȯrd·ər‚land]
(geology)
One of the crystalline, continental landmasses postulated to have existed on the exterior (oceanward) side of geosynclines.
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, this new international alliance of geospatial technology professionals, the GTGTA-U, must be cognizant of the power of maps (Harley, Laxton 2002) and use their technical expertise to influence policy makers to invest in a desperately needed improvement in borderland geographic information.
Empirically, Ishikawa focuses on one part of the borderlands that Tagliacozzo describes, namely the rural areas located between Malaysian Sarawak and Indonesian Kalimantan in southwestern Borneo.
We reach the important point we want to make in this paper, which is that where the failure of national governments to address border issues and borderland daily challenges is acknowledged, identitary constructions processed in the longue duree provide the ordinary frames for cross-border governance as a collective action.
On such small territory as Lithuanian-Polish-Belarusian borderland it is possible to investigate two opposite, reciprocal processes: disappearances (the Lithuanian-Polish borderland) and strengthening of borders (the Lithuanian-Belarusian and Polish-Belarusian borderland).
In the eyes of the author, the non-colonial aspect of Puerto Rico's government makes it equivalent to the borderland (pp.
Unlike the borderlands between the United States and Mexico (the Spanish Borderlands), comparatively little scholarly interest has been paid to the Canadian-American borderlands.
The borderland space invites people into the alternate awareness that there is no safe home except the in-between space.
The falsity of this construct is revealed by attention to the porosity of the frontier: "the borderland has traditionally been identified as the site where this particular version of Dominicanness ('not Haitian') is most under threat" (p.
Robert Lawrence Gunn's Ethnology and Empire examines the "scenarios of troubled linguistic exchange and communicative misrecognition" that "echo routinely across the shifting borderlands and contact zones of American history" (3).
By interpreting the West as a borderland of competing interests, Hogue reminds historians to interpret the act of "nation-making" as a process that "hinged on subverting the sovereignty of Indigenous people and incorporating them as domestic subjects in new nation-states" (5).
This study of a borderland where national identities abut is significant for many reasons.
Scholars of the Underground Railroad as well as those in borderland studies will appreciate the interdisciplinary mix and unique contributions of this volume.