Boring

(redirected from boringness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms.

Boring

 

(in Russian, rastachivanie), a mechanical process for machining interior surfaces by boring (cutting) tools in order to increase the diameter of a hole. Boring is done on lathes, boring machines, and other metal-cutting machines. It is possible to machine blind and through holes, both cylindrical and conical, as well as grooves and slots. Boring yields a machining precision of classes 4 or 5 and a surface roughness of classes 2 or 3.


Boring

 

(in Russian, rassverlivanie), mechanical working of an existing hole with a drill in order to increase the diameter. It is done either by machine, using drilling and boring machines, lathes and other metalcutting machines, or by hand, using pneumatic or electric drills. The precision achieved is of the fourth to fifth class, and the surface roughness is of the second to third class.

boring, borehole

A hole drilled in the ground to obtain soil samples for evaluation and to obtain information about the strata.
References in periodicals archive ?
In fact, even boringness and boredom communicate a great deal about cultures.
One standard answer to the standard anxiety about the boringness of Canadian history is to say that it includes too many of the now proverbial dead white men and is therefore irrelevant to the concerns of the general or (what is much the same thing) undergraduate population.
American Danny Karbassiyoon, formerly of Arsenal, greeted his move to Turf Moor with the words "Burnley is conveniently located near Manchester, Liverpool, Leeds, Bolton and Blackburn so dspite its boringness there is plenty to do outside of the town."
10 minutes, mind-numbing boringness and stupidity will make you forget that beauty.
'So it may be best to go for a dusky colour on the bottom to get her out of her black boringness.
Staring at Susan Sontag's wall-sized face for several minutes, one is rewarded with Zen-ish insight into Warhol's power and boringness. Excited by the slightest relief from the monotony, be it flicker or twitch, our sense of palpable anticlimax puts us where celebrity and nothingness are one.
[17] Ann Gordon remembered, "Women in the city had the luxury of bein' entertained as they did their housework because they could listen to the radio, or watch television, or even talk on the phone to take some of the boringness away and to make their work load seem lighter and less of a burden." [18] Mary Tucker said, "These things--the radio, and television--was way, way different than what we knowed or had seen because they connected us to the world....
Clark's intention seems to be to resist the easy appeal of the boringness of eternal life.