borrow

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borrow

1. Golf a deviation of a ball from a straight path because of the slope of the ground
2. material dug from a borrow pit to provide fill at another

Borrow

George (Henry). 1803--81, English traveller and writer. His best-known works are the semiautobiographical novels of Gypsy life and language, Lavengro (1851) and its sequel The Romany Rye (1857)

borrow

[′bä·rō]
(civil engineering)
Earth material such as sand and gravel that is taken from one location to be used as fill at another.
(mathematics)
An arithmetically negative carry; it occurs in direct subtraction by raising the low-order digit of the minuend by one unit of the next-higher-order digit; for example, when subtracting 67 from 92, a tens digit is borrowed from the 9, to raise the 2 to a factor of 12; the 7 of 67 is then subtracted from the 12 to yield 5 as the units digit of the difference; the 6 is then subtracted from 8, or 9-1, yielding 2 as the tens digit of the difference.

borrow

Material taken from one location for use as fill elsewhere.
References in periodicals archive ?
During 2010, 21,036 borrowers across the four provinces were paid claims of Rs 549 million and their break-up was Rs 351.
The borrower should be required to deliver a detailed cost budget of the project.
Editor's note: Workouts of second-lien loans have become a significant issue for lenders--and for borrowers, if the lenders aren't experienced with resolving problem loans.
Borrowers have 270 days of nonpayment before their loan goes into default, according to the Department of Education.
The tax department of most conduit borrowers may not have been heavily involved in the initial bond offering, which is typically a company treasury function.
The program has 12 volunteers and 16 borrowers, with room for more, Aronoff said.
The FHA also has a high portfolio share for lending to lower-income or minority borrowers and neighborhoods relative to the participants in the conventional mortgage system.
Finally, whenever possible, borrowers should try to negotiate a loan without personal recourse.
Due to the unexpected inflation in the 1970s, the interest paid by the borrowers regularly exceeded the caps, and Continental subsequently made substantial refunds to its borrowers.
From making extremely risky loans above government cost to embryonic borrowers with nowhere else to turn, the federal government started making extremely safe loans at below government cost to longstanding institutions that could easily raise money elsewhere.
Most notably, borrowers with Parent PLUS or GradPLUS loans through the Direct Loan program might already have a low fixed rate.