bosons


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Related to bosons: Gluons, Higgs bosons, Mesons, Gauge bosons

bosons

(boh -zonz) A class of elementary particles with integer values (positive, negative, or zero) of spin; the photon is an example. More than one boson can exist with an identical set of quantum numbers (numbers assigned to the various quantities that describe a particle). See also fermions; fundamental forces.
References in periodicals archive ?
(https://www.space.com/41654-higgs-boson-decays-bottom-quarks.html) Physicists believe there could be a whole plethora of Higgs Bosons that are just too heavy for us to see with the current generation of particle colliders.
He predicted the existence of a field made up of Higgs bosons, where particles gain mass as they move through the field.
Lagrangian of the gauge bosons in the B-L model is generally given by
But according to theory, Higgs bosons should decay over half of the time into bottom quarks, the second-heaviest type of quark.
It is logically lawful to guess that, in analogy to the second generation, this mass consists as well of three bosons (the average mass of each is 1 TeV).
Fabiola Gianotti led one of two teams that discovered the Higgs boson, the most exciting feat of modern physics.
Two years ago the LHC team at Cern, the European Organisation for Nuclear Research, astounded the world with the discovery of the Higgs boson, an elementary particle that gives other particles mass.
The Higgs Boson was named after Professor Peter Higgs, emeritus professor at Edinburgh University.
Professor Vincenzo Chiochia from the University of Zurich's Physics Institute said that they now know that the Higgs particle can decay into both bosons and fermions, which means they can exclude certain theories predicting that the Higgs particle does not couple to fermions.
His theory - developed with Francois Englert, of Belgium, who was jointly awarded the prize - was con-firmed last year by the discovery of the so-called Higgs boson at a laboratory in Geneva.
Supersymmetry postulates a fundamental relationship between the classes of particles known as fermions and bosons. Fermions are particles such as quarks and electrons, which make up what we normally think of as matter.