botfly

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botfly,

common name for several families of hairy fliesfly,
name commonly used for any of a variety of winged insects, but properly restricted to members of the order Diptera, the true flies, which includes the housefly, gnat, midge, mosquito, and tsetse fly.
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 whose larvae live as parasites within the bodies of mammals. The horse botfly secretes an irritating substance that is used to attach its eggs to the body hairs of a horse, mule, or donkey. When the animal licks off the irritant, the larvae are carried into the host's mouth and later migrate to the stomach. They attach themselves to the lining, where they feed until ready to pupate, and then drop to the ground with the feces. The larvae, which may cause serious damage to the digestive tract and weaken the animal, can be eliminated by a veterinarian. Sheep botflies lay their eggs in the nostrils of the host without alighting. The larvae work their way up into the head cavities causing fits of vertigo known as blind staggers; failure to eat because of irritability may result in death. Old World species of this family attack camels, elephants, horses, mules, donkeys, and deer. The warble flies, also called heel flies, or bomb flies, parasitize cattle and other animals. The larvae, called cattle grubs or cattle maggots, penetrate the skin of the host immediately after hatching; they migrate through the flesh, causing irritability, loss of weight, and decreased milk production, and then settle under the skin of the back, producing cysts, or warbles. Breathing holes made in the warbles by the larvae damage the hide. A species of human botfly found in Central and South America attaches its eggs to a bloodsucking mosquito that it captures and then releases. When the mosquito comes in contact with humans or other warm-blooded animals, the fly eggs hatch and the larvae fasten to the mammal's skin. The larvae bore into muscle tissue; infestation is called myiasis. For control methods, see bulletins of the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture. The botflies are classified in the phylum ArthropodaArthropoda
[Gr.,=jointed feet], largest and most diverse animal phylum. The arthropods include crustaceans, insects, centipedes, millipedes, spiders, scorpions, and the extinct trilobites.
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, class Insecta, order Diptera. Horse botflies are classified in the family Gasterophilidae; sheep botflies and warble flies are classified in the family Oestridae; the human botfly is classified in the family Cuterebridae. See insectinsect,
invertebrate animal of the class Insecta of the phylum Arthropoda. Like other arthropods, an insect has a hard outer covering, or exoskeleton, a segmented body, and jointed legs. Adult insects typically have wings and are the only flying invertebrates.
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References in periodicals archive ?
ovis infestions in domestic carnivores might be due to peculiar sheep bot fly preferences and, in general, due to the strong relationship between oestrids and herbivores.
Castillo, "Canine myiasis by sheep bot fly (Diptera: Oestridae)," Journal of Medical Entomology, vol.
Multiple studies have examined at bot fly infection rates in P leucopus and P maniculatus throughout North America (Table 1).
2006 Effects of Bot Fly Parasitism on Movements of Peromyscus leucopus.
In relation to time variation in the occurrence of bot fly parasitism in Akodon species, Zuleta and Vignau (1990) recorded that the highest infection rate occurred in late spring and fall.
Bot fly parasitism (Rogenhofera bonariensis) (Diptera, Cuterebridae) in the Pampean grassland mouse (Akodon azarae) in Argentina.
We predicted that: (1) animals would move shorter distances from their center of activity when they were infested compared to when they were uninfested, (2) animals with multiple bot fly infestations would move shorter distances from their center of activity than those that harbored a single larva and (3) individuals would have a different center of activity when infested compared to when they were uninfested.
Ivermectin as medical therapy for ophthalmomyiasis interna has not been reported, but it is effective as therapy and prophylaxis for bot fly infestation of livestock (9).
The respiratory and allergic manifestations of human myiasis caused by larvae of the sheep bot fly (Oestrus ovis): a report of 33 pharyngeal cases from southern Iran.
Human and livestock migrations: a history of bot fly biodiversity in the Mediterranean region.