bottled gas


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bottled gas

[¦bäd·əld ′gas]
(materials)
Butane, propane, or butane-propane mixtures liquefied and bottled under pressure for use as a domestic cooking or heating fuel. Also known as bugas.
References in periodicals archive ?
The HGV carrying bottled gas stopped after the collision, but was then in collision with a third wagon towing a curtain side trailer.
The chance of getting bottled gas in a remote village is virtually nil, but you can buy paraffin from lots of settlements, and sometimes even passing horsemen will sell you a couple of litres.
No external bottled gas is necessary, thereby eliminating potential manual handling and safety risks.
A TYCOON whose "gargantuan" scam led to his bottled gas company collapsing benefited from his crimes by a staggering pounds 13m.
The project covers installation of more than 350 km of polyethylene-lined pipes to connect residential and commercial properties to the national gas grid, plus about 2,500 residential gas metres, the conversion of the existing bottled gas networks to natural gas, and construction of primary and secondary pressure-reduction stations.
The agency wants to change the standard for Liquefied Petroleum Gas (Bottled Gas) Dealers, NAICS code 454312, from $6.5 million in average annual receipts to 50 employees.
Electric fan models, bottled gas ones and several paraffin types were tested, and it was clear that each has its own pros and cons, according to the report, which appears in the November issue of the magazine.
British fuel cell company Ceres Power recently announced the achievement of a "key technical milestone" -- establishing that the company's fuel cell (FC) can be engineered into a power generating system fueled by bottled gas.
To meet this demand the company expanded both its service territory, and products by delivering "bottled gas," now known as propane, to areas that did not have access to the utility system.
An excellent choice for oxygen cylinders, fine instrument threads, valves on bottled gas and in oxygen systems.
However, more sophisticated distilling operations using bottled gas that leaves none of the tell-tale signs of turf smoke may also be making moonshiners more difficult to detect.
Typical approaches include the use of stack filters that trap up to 60% of particulates from boiler emissions, conversion of raw coal to coal briquettes (which release less fly ash when burned), central heating systems for urban buildings, and in some cases residents' use of bottled gas instead of coal.