Bottle

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bottle

[′bäd·əl]
(engineering)
A container made from pipe or plate with drawn, forged, or spun end closures, and used for storing or transporting gas.

Bottle

 

a glass vessel with a narrow neck. In Russia, before the introduction of the metric system of measures, a bottle was a legal measure of fluids. The wine bottle was equal to one-sixteenth of a bucket (0.68 liter) and the vodka or beer bottle was equal to one-twentieth of a bucket (0.615 liter).

What does it mean when you dream about a bottle?

A bottle of wine can mean celebration, the good life. Or, more negatively, “hitting the bottle” or to be “on the bottle.” A baby bottle can be associated with infantile desires or, more positively, nurturance. We also talk about how one “bottles up” emotions, or how “the genie is out of the bottle.”

bottle

Old English term for bowtell.
References in classic literature ?
Dolokhov, the bottle of rum still in his hand, jumped onto the window sill.
He nodded approbation and reached for the second bottle.
Well, perhaps you are right, sir," said she, and was about to take down the bottle when the Crooked Magician suddenly called to her excitedly from the fireplace.
He concluded a long harangue by taking off his funnel-cap, inserting the tube into my gullet, and thus deluging me with an ocean of Kirschenwässer, which he poured, in a continuous flood, from one of the long necked bottles that stood him instead of an arm.
He must have drunk a gill before he took the bottle from his mouth.
As she spoke, she drained the basin into the ashes of the fire, and broke the bottle on the hearth.
With these words, that excellent person took a most energetic pull at the bottle, and handed it to Ben Allen, who was not slow to imitate his example.
The odour from the wicker bottle (which has somehow passed into Durdles's keeping) soon intimates that the cork has been taken out; but this is not ascertainable through the sense of sight, since neither can descry the other.
It did so indeed, and much sooner than she had expected: before she had drunk half the bottle, she found her head pressing against the ceiling, and had to stoop to save her neck from being broken.
When she had taken this gentle exercise for some time, she sat down upon the steps and called 'George'; whereupon a man in a carter's frock, who had been so shrouded in a hedge up to this time as to see everything that passed without being seen himself, parted the twigs that concealed him, and appeared in a sitting attitude, supporting on his legs a baking-dish and a half-gallon stone bottle, and bearing in his right hand a knife, and in his left a fork.
Feeling convinced that she was in imminent danger of becoming downright drunk if I gave her another glass, I kept my hand on the bottle, and forthwith told my story over again in a very abridged and unceremonious form, and without allowing her one moment of leisure for comment on my narrative, whether it might be of the weeping, winking, drinking, groaning, or ejaculating kind.
Listen, you scoundrel, and look at that Dutch bottle.