bounce

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bounce

the bounce Australian Rules football the start of play at the beginning of each quarter or after a goal

bounce

i. A term used in or before air combat when an aircraft is attacked by surprise or caught unguarded. To bounce means to catch enemy aircraft unaware.
ii. While landing, to get airborne momentarily after touchdown.

bounce

(1)
(Perhaps by analogy to a bouncing check) An electronic mail message that is undeliverable and returns an error notification (a "bounce message") to the sender is said to "bounce".

bounce

(2)
To play volleyball. The now-demolished D. C. Power Lab building used by the Stanford AI Lab in the 1970s had a volleyball court on the front lawn. From 5 PM to 7 PM was the scheduled maintenance time for the computer, so every afternoon at 5 would come over the intercom the cry: "Now hear this: bounce, bounce!", followed by Brian McCune loudly bouncing a volleyball on the floor outside the offices of known volleyballers.

bounce

(3)
To engage in sexual intercourse; probably from the expression "bouncing the mattress", but influenced by Roo's psychosexually loaded "Try bouncing me, Tigger!" from the "Winnie-the-Pooh" books.

Compare boink.

bounce

(4)
To casually reboot a system in order to clear up a transient problem. Reported primarily among VMS users.

bounce

(5)
(VM/CMS programmers) Automatic warm-start of a computer after an error. "I logged on this morning and found it had bounced 7 times during the night"

bounce

(6)
(IBM) To power cycle a peripheral in order to reset it.
References in periodicals archive ?
IT'S one of Coventry's more unusual landmarks - long known for its small but at times unsettling bounce - but just how much can the Canal Basin footbridge bounce?
An increase in your email bounce rate can indicate that you need to increase your list maintenance.
The researchers conclude that the bounces increase because the zinc oxide forms tiny bridges within the zinc material, which decreases the mechanical damping of the battery.
At the time, the CBC said the list was unfair because circumstances in the wake of the Eurogroup decision made it all too easy for account holders to unwittingly bounce cheques.
Previous bounces have raised thousands for the charity, which is the UK's leading regional medical research charity.
Any individual who writes a cheque with insufficient funds - causing the same to bounce - can face imprisonment of one month to three years, or a fine of a minimum of Dh1,000.
In Bounce, McFarland, the 2010 Super Session speaker for NACM's upcoming Credit Congress and Exposition, focuses on a "frequently overlooked but universal truth: It's often during life's most difficult times that we discover our most critical hidden strengths and that we forge our most important capabilities.
As part of their ongoing efforts to combat the issuing of cheques that are likely to bounce, the Dubai police have signed a data-sharing agreement with Emcredit, an entity that is developing a credit database of people and companies.
So far, 2008 looks more like 2004 than earlier elections in terms of pre-convention voter interest levels, and if the convention bounces of 1964 through 2000 were largely a product of low pre-convention levels of voter attention, then there may not be big surges in candidate support this year.
Some are soft, some are firm, some can bounce really high, others float--and don't forget the badminton birdie, where the ball is just on the bottom.
But the biggest bounce of the night fell to UCLA's Noelle Quinn, who hit a turn-around 10-footer, that bounced off the rim twice before falling in with 5.
the market bounces further and goes into long-term consolidation before entering the next secular bull market), the move to the previous historical high will be from a higher plateau.