bound electron

bound electron

[¦bau̇nd i′lek‚trän]
(atomic physics)
An electron whose wave function is negligible except in the vicinity of an atom.
References in periodicals archive ?
A portion of the energy of the WIMP will not go to recoil, but it will be spent to release the bound electron. The second comes from the fact that the initial electron is not at rest but it has a momentum distribution, which is the Fourier transform of its wave function in coordinate space.
In accordance with the fundamental <<Pauli exclusion principle>> in the atom of substance in its electronic shells can be only one so-called bound electron, characterized by the appropriate only for him to certain quantitative set of four quantum numbers used in atomic physics [4, 7]: the principal quantum number n; orbital quantum number l; magnetic quantum number [m.sub.l]; spin quantum number [m.sub.s].
The ionization potential --how much energy it takes to strip an atom of its most weakly bound electron --hints at how that atom's electrons are arranged.
Theory of bound electron (hole) phonon scattering is used to explain the conductivity in samples having low doping of impurities.
The model calculates the sum of all processes (5) through (8) that lead to the ejection of a bound electron. Moreover, the model also assumes-erroneously--that all energy transfers from the incident electron to the target molecule that exceed the ionization energy of a given molecular orbital result in ionization.
Nearly 60 years ago, the French physicist Pierre Auger discovered that atoms brought to an excited state can undergo a transition to a lower energy state by emitting a bound electron.
In Section 4, we discuss the case of neutrino scattering on one bound electron. Hydrogen-like states and a semiclassical limit are considered.
Confirming results Researchers have been able to capitalize on a process called high harmonic generation to image the wave function of an N2 molecule's most weakly bound electron. (The wave function describes the probability that the electron will be in any one state at a given time.) The colors in the images above show that experiment agrees with theory.
When the impurity concentration is low, the electrons or holes are bound to the impurity atoms and the theory of bound electron (hole)-phonon scattering is used to explain the phonon conductivity values of the samples with low doping.
A less tightly bound electron orbiting farther away then falls into the more internal vacancy while the atom ejects a third, "Auger" electron.
A manganese atom also has a similar magnetic moment and a closed electronic shell of more tightly bound electrons, and Khanna said that the new cluster could be regarded as a mimic of a manganese atom.