bound water


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bound water

[¦bau̇nd ′wȯd·ər]
(chemistry)
Water that is a portion of a system such as tissues or soil and does not form ice crystals until the material's temperature is lowered to about -20°C.
References in periodicals archive ?
This purely physical mechanism of bound water could be explained if most water has been removed from the polymer, reducing the degree of plasticization, and decreasing chain segment movement, then the only way to remove the trapped water molecules would be to significantly increase the temperature, as was referred to above.
Furthermore, the collagen fibrils near the articular surface are of a much smaller diameter and more closely packed.[42] Williams et al .[43] showed that UTE-T2* mapping could quantitatively evaluate bulk water, bound water and organic matrix of the AC, which could indirectly show the content of collagen and fiber anisotropy.
The content of chemically bound water, [W.sub.b], was determined from the weight loss recorded on TGA thermogram between 105 and 1000[degrees]C, according to the procedure proposed by Monteagudo et al.
Based on LF-NMR results, the water in samples was characterized by three forms: bound water (0.1~10ms), immobilized water (10~100ms), and free water (100~1000ms) [22, 23].
As shown in Figure 5(a), the bulk O-O RDF produced a peak at 3 [Angstrom], whereas the distribution of O in the bound water with O in the solvent water (Figure 5(b)) produced stronger peaks at the lesser distance of 2.7 [Angstrom].
Under high temperatures, the bound water transfers to a liquid state, and the liquid water evaporates to a gaseous state.
As the hull is covered in bound water, most organisms will simply not recognize it as a suitable surface and find a home elsewhere.
The 3M Interam Endothermic Mat is a flexible mat with endothermic technology that, when exposed to high temperatures or flame, releases chemically bound water to slow heat transfer and help protect critical electrical and structural components from fire.
Water in this state is called "freezing bound water." Non-freezing water and freezing bound water together are called "bound water." Water that is absorbed within a hydrophilic polymer but exhibits a melting temperature and enthalpy of fusion that is undistinguishable from free water is called "freezing water" and appears at even higher degrees of swelling.
The bound water in living tissue is more likely to play a major role in tolerance to abiotic stresses (El-Saidi et al., 1975 and Rascio et al., 1998) by maintaining the structural integrity and/or cell wall extensibility of the leaves, whilst the decreased amount of free water might be able to enhance solute accumulation, leading to better osmotic adjustment and tolerance to water stress, and maintenance of the volumes of sub-cellular compartments.
Around biomolecules, dissolved in water with apolar groups, the water layers in the form of chains and radially arranged layers are structured; such layers of water are called "bound water".
With a greater hydraulic gradient, the filtration process involves more capillary bound water volume, but at the same time increases the filtration discharge and hydraulic conductivity.