embourgeoisement

(redirected from bourgeoisification)
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Related to bourgeoisification: embourgeoisement

embourgeoisement

or

bourgeoisification

the process of becoming bourgeois or, more generally MIDDLE CLASS.
References in periodicals archive ?
is willing to accept nothing more than token bourgeoisification within
What is revealing is how the Anglo CPC leadership's criticisms of Ukrainians as ethnically isolated were then imposed by ULFTA leadership onto the Women's Section, pejoratively referred to as a "breeding ground of pure burgherism, petty bourgeoisification, intrigue" (100) and countless other bad things.
What can be taken for granted is that a decisive step has been taken towards the bourgeoisification and reorganization of the city as a centre of consumption of the new Vietnamese middle class and, of course, of tourists and foreign residents.
These debates had high class stakes; they were part and parcel of the gradual bourgeoisification of the English theater.
As a general formula, Cropsey offers that whatever hope we have must come from drawing from the inspiriting wellsprings of modernity, which seems to mean those that can emancipate us from the unmediated longing for survival, security, self-indulgence and general bourgeoisification.
In a study of the history of two leading African-American millennialist faiths, Pentecostalism and the Nation of Islam, Clarence Taylor argues that bourgeoisification has recently blunted their apocalyptic fervor.
These few oases of bourgeoisification suggest that if given half a chance, it may not be long before the Korean masses follow the Chinese down the slippery slope of counterrevolution.
Within the context of those interpretations emphasizing slave bourgeoisification, antebellum slaves are presented as cooperative, almost willing workers.
For instance, Tugal notes that an interlocking problem of corruption, bourgeoisification, and deradicalization of the Islamist party caused popular disappointment among the Islamists in the community.
It also names key features of dress fashion that became common with the French Revolution and the abolition of the dress code according to estate (Perrot 38): (5) a bourgeoisification and individualization of clothing, the constant transformations of which amounted to deliberate allusion--in this case to Greek antiquity as an expression of republican sentiments.