bowerbird


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bowerbird,

common name for any of several species of birds of the family Ptilonorhynchidae, native to Australia and New Guinea, which build, for courtship display, a bower of sticks or grasses. Usually the males construct the bowers, some of which are large (up to 9 ft/275 cm high), while others are like small cabins or runways. The crestless gardener bowerbird, Amblyornis inornatus, makes a lawn around its bower. Colored stones, shells, feathers, flowers, and other bright objects, which are replaced when they become withered or worn, are used to decorate the lawns and the bowers. The satin bowerbird, Ptilonorhyncus violaceus, prefers blue decorative articles. The bower is constructed by the male in his effort to attract a female and probably has no other function than for the courtship performance. After mating has taken place in the bower, a nest is built by the female away from the bower, and there the clutch of two eggs is laid. The birds are crowlike and lack the showy plumage of the related bird of paradise. The bowers may be high pyramids, such as those built by the five species of maypole builder bowerbirds, or lower, more intricate, and painted with blue and green paints made of saliva and pigments, such as those built by the satin bowerbird and regent bowerbird (Sericulus chrysocephalus). The great gray bowerbird (genus Chlamydera) of Australia is the largest member of the family, being 15 in. (37.5 cm) long. Bowerbirds do not have very pleasant calls, but they are good mimics; sometimes other species' songs are included in their repertoires. Bowerbirds are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Passeriformes, family Ptilonorhynchidae.

bowerbird

any of various songbirds of the family Ptilonorhynchidae, of Australia and New Guinea. The males build bower-like display grounds in the breeding season to attract the females
References in periodicals archive ?
Bowerbirds can mimic the calls of other birds, as well as other animal sounds and human voices, but little is known about why they do it, and how they learn and expand their repertoire.
Humans begin with a body and then, like the male bowerbirds of Australia, proceed to build an elaborate construct on and around that body.
Male bowerbirds weave fancy stick structures called bowers to impress female birds.
At that point, one felt in the presence of a melancholy bowerbird, wandering around in the terminal moraine of globalism, picking up shards and transforming them through skillful arrangement and an erotically charged grace under pressure into active, still-significant things.
Arrive at the photo of a bowerbird decorating its nest with various odds and ends--all blue--and who wouldn't want to know more?
So take a listen to an ivory-billed woodpecker, common loon, marbled wood quail, satin bowerbird, red-ruffed fruitcrow, superb lyrebird, Australian magpie, common nighthawk, common raven, or canyon wren.
They found that the pied currawong, emu, Australian magpie, satin bowerbird and black-faced cuckoo-shrike, were all tong distance seed dispersal agents.
And if another bowerbird has something in his bower that would look good in front of mine, I'll just steal it
Court site constancy, dispersion, male survival and court ownership in the male Tooth-billed Bowerbird, Scenopeetes dentirostris (Ptilorhynchidae).
Molecular information on bowerbird phylogeny and the evolution of exaggerated male characteristics.
Another species, the bowerbird, builds such highly decorated bowers that early explorers were convinced people had made them for children's entertainment.
As a biological explorer, his most widely publicized finding was his rediscovery, at the top of New Guinea's remote Foja Mountains, of the long-lost Golden-fronted Bowerbird, previously known only from four specimens found in a Paris feather shop in 1895.