brachial


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brachial

[′brā·kē·əl]
(zoology)
Of or relating to an arm or armlike process.
References in periodicals archive ?
Brachial plexus injuries can occur because of the normal forces of labor and delivery.
Keywords: Electromyography and Nerve Conduction Studies (EMG/NCS), Guillain Barre Syndrome (GBS), Pharyngeal cervical brachial (PCB).
Brachial plexus avulsion injury (BPAI) represents one of the most devastating injuries of the upper extremity, and nerve transfer is the most frequently used method in restoring upper limb function for such serious lesion.
Primary outcome measures included carotid artery stenosis and ankle brachial index.
Regional anesthesia in the brachial plexus has several clinical applications and multiple advantages over general anesthesia in upper limb surgery, including better postoperative analgesia, (1,2) lower opioid use, (3-5) less postoperative nausea and vomiting (6-8) and, consequently, decreased use of antiemetics, shorter time to ambulation and hospital discharge (6,9,10) and shorter PACU stay.
The brachial plexus (BP) provides sensory and motor innervation to the ipsilateral shoulder, chest, arm, and hand.
Depending on the severity of their brachial plexus injury, people can lose the use of their shoulder, elbow, hand or even their entire arm from the shoulder down.
Additionally, the rate of brachial plexus injury decreased significantly from 2.
For the wire to bypass the occlusion, a subintimal plane was created resulting in an area of dissection in the proximal brachial artery (Figure 2).
The aim of our study was to evaluate the effects of levobupivacaine and compare it with ropivacaine in brachial plexus block through supraclavicular route.