brachial


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Related to brachial: brachial plexus, brachial artery, Brachial plexus injury, brachial neuritis

brachial

[′brā·kē·əl]
(zoology)
Of or relating to an arm or armlike process.
References in periodicals archive ?
1] The brachial plexus is a network of nerves that originate in the neck region and branch off to form most of the other nerves that control movement and sensation in the upper limbs, including the shoulder, arm, forearm, and hand.
Blunt or penetrating trauma with fracture, dislocation, or hematoma formation may produce compression stretching or avulsion of the brachial plexus.
Endothelial function was previously assessed in shift workers after night work, and reduced flow-mediated dilation of the brachial artery was found, independent of shift- work history (7).
Brachial plexus injuries usually involve either pre-ganglionic avulsion or post-ganglionic rupture.
Anterior dislocation of the shoulders with bilateral brachial plexus injury.
Thirteen subjects underwent brachial artery endothelial function testing at baseline and after at least six weeks of treatment with 10 mg/day folic acid or placebo, using FMD as a quantifiable measure of endothelial-dependent vascular function.
Most patients with diabetic amputations do not have a decreased ankle brachial index.
The packet--created with the help of ATLA members experienced in these cases--contains a sample complaint; depositions and deposition summaries of plaintiff and defense medical experts highlighting brachial plexus injuries sustained during delivery; ATLA Education speaker papers and TRIAL articles regarding brachial plexus and other injuries; clinical practice guideline summaries regarding childbirth standards and procedures; a medical literature guide, Shoulder Dystocia, from Medifocus, an Exchange alliance member; selected Internet resources; a glossary of medical terms; and medical illustrations from Medical Legal Art: The Doe Report, another alliance member.
It found that blood pressure (BP)-lowering drugs can have substantially different effects on central aortic pressures and hemodynamics, despite a similar impact on brachial (upper arm) BP.
2005), we included only subjects who were at least 40 years of age and we defined PAD as an ankle brachial index of > 0.