brachyfacial


Also found in: Medical.

brachyfacial

[‚brak·ə′fāsh·əl]
(anthropology)
Having a short or broad face.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sample was divided into three groups (mesofacial, brachyfacial and dolichofacial) (Table 2) using three angular measurements (Ricketts, 1989) (Figure 1), i.
To further assess such differences between groups, we once again performed the analysis comparing the mesofacial versus brachyfacial and then the mesofacial versus dolichofacial groups.
The study concluded that brachyfacial subjects over dolichofacial and mesiofacials provides increased space for full eruption of the mandibular third molars, so decreased mandibular 3rd molar impactions were seen in brachyfacials as compared to the other two groups.
15 Brachyfacial is the term used to describe the person with a short anterior face height and a wide face, cephalometrically >93 facial axis angle.
Extreme brachyfacial types with short alveolar and crown height dimensions
It has been reported that the masticatory muscles of dolichofacial subjects are less efficient in generating bite force at a particular point on the lever arm, due to reduced mechanics when compared to brachyfacial subjects.
It has been reported that dolichofacial subjects need greater muscular effort during mastication as compared to meso- and brachyfacial subjects.
Based on our measurements and calculations, facial types were designated as either dolichofacial (long face), mesofacial (harmonic), or brachyfacial (short) according to the classification described by Ricketts et al (figure 6).
The distribution of facial types in the two groups * OM group Controls Facial type (n = 32) (n = 34) Total Dolichofacial, severe 10 16 26 Dolichofacial, mild 4 5 9 Mesofacial 12 4 16 Brachyfacial 2 5 7 Brachyfacial, severe 4 4 8 * No correlation was found between facial type and otitis media ([chi square] = 9.
The facial skeletal pattern, often referred as facial type, when analyzed radiographically, can be classified as dolichofacial (more long and narrow face), brachyfacial (more shorter and wider face), and mesiofacial (intermediate type) (RICKETTS et al.
Although not significant, it is interesting to note that ovoid arches were more prevalent in brachyfacial individuals, the square form in mesofacial types, and the tapered arch in dolichofacial individuals (Table 1).