bracing


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Related to bracing: bracing up

bracing

[′brās·iŋ]
(engineering)
The act or process of strengthening or making rigid.

bracing

1. Structural elements installed to provide restraint or support (or both) to other members, so that the complete assembly forms a stable structure; may consist of knee braces, cables, rods, struts, ties, shores, diaphragms, rigid frames, etc., singly or in combination.
2. Collectively, the braces so used.

bracing

bracingclick for a larger image
Examples of bracing on a biplane.
The supporting struts and wires used in the strengthening of the structure. Each set of wires serves a particular purpose. Flying or lift wires prevent the wings from folding up during flight; landing wires prevent the wing from sagging while the aircraft is on the ground, and incidence wires maintain the wings at their correct angle of incidence.
References in periodicals archive ?
* Bottom line: A trial of counterforce bracing should be used if pain precludes active rehabilitation or vocational pursuits, but should not be used as the sole therapy.
Levy, "Knee injuries and the use of prophylactic knee bracing in off-road motorcycling: results of a large-scale epidemiological study," The American Journal of Sports Medicine, vol.
They arrive to similar conclusions: there are some data suggesting that bracing may be effective preventing and reducing severity of MCL injuries, but there is no conclusive evidence for PKB decreasing the rate or severity of ACL injuries in football players (1, 33, 34).
Dobbs, "Effects of bracing in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis," NEngl J Med, vol.
The mentioned frame with a single diagonal bracing, under cyclic loading (Fig.
In the present study, a finite element numerical method has been used to model the frames and evaluating the nonlinear response of belt braces has been applied as a lateral bracing system.
A total of 242 patients were included in the primary analysis: 51 patients assigned to back bracing, 65 assigned to observation, 88 who chose back bracing, and 38 who chose observation.
During a discussion of the study, an attendee said that in her practice she avoids using the type of brace used in the study with a cutout over the knee in younger patients with PF pain, because of data suggesting that bracing compresses the patella and increases the contact area between the patella and the trochlear notch, thereby increasing stress rather than changing the patella position or movement.
Large-scale bracing (LSB) system is a particular form of space truss.
As Blake once said: "Damn braces, Bless relaxes." Or in an echo from Frankie Goes to Hollywood: "Relax, don't do it." The truth is that bracing yourself to prepare for some possibly unpleasant event that may never happen simply doesn't work.
The most widely used method to assess the efficacy of knee bracing in-vivo has been the arthrometry test in which a device is externally strapped to the lower leg and the tibial translation is recorded during anterior shear loading (Beck et al., 1986; Branch et al., 1988; Colville et al., 1986; Mishra et al., 1989; Rink et al., 1989; Risberg et al., 1999).